6

Sep

Our top 4 tips to create a better relationship with exercise

When the alarm goes off or you knock off work what’s the first thought that crosses your mind?

There’s normally two:

– “Oh shit I have to workout now” or

– “Hell yeah I get to workout now!”

Which ever one it is for you know that it’s not going to change if you don’t change what you do.

The routine of decision making and the feeling that comes along with it in regards to a workout that you’ve planned is going to effect the workout positively or negatively. You set the tone for not only the feeling you get during each workout out but the overall outcome of you training.

Think of it like doing a presentation. How much more work are you going to put into it if you actually enjoy the subject that your working on? It’s the same principle for training and working out.

When you find something you enjoy doing the routine becomes easier and eventually the routine becomes a highlight of your day and the pressure to stay in the routine wears off. What takes it’s place is the PLEASURE of exercise and all the benefits that come with it.

As a personal trainer I take the pleasure of exercise for granted but from communicating with clients and members I’m staggered to find that so many people go to the gym, train or workout purely from a routine or chore perspective. Their mindset is “it’s what I should do” not “it’s what I want to do”.  This perspective drives a feeling of another box to tick for the day or responsibility that I have weighing me down.  These are the people I want to help see the light of connecting with exercise on a different level and changing the game.

STEPS TO MAKE THE TRANSITION

1 – Find something you ENJOY doing – Don’t get stuck on the stationary gym equipment, the body is made to move let it do its thing, the mindlessness of setting a machine for a set time and peddling away only to be snapped back awake by the cool down buzzer is doing very little for you physically and even less mentally and endorphins sitting waiting to be let loose will remain mostly dormant, which leads me to my next step.

2 – CHANGE YOUR ENVIRONMENT – You don’t have to keep doing what your doing now, if your training doesn’t challenge, inspire and interest you then change it! Don’t get caught in the rat race of exercises and scroll through social media envious of all the people that seem to love training, If you want to try a boxing class go and do it. If you want to try yoga or a pole dancing class book in and show up. It’s that easy, how will you not know what you love doing if you don’t try new things out. Don’t worry, everyone else in that class were first timers at some time too. My experience is that most people in the gym or in a class will be totally flattered if you ask for their help.

3 – CHALLENGE YOURSELF – Accomplishment is one of the most rewarding feelings you can have and in the gym environment this feeling should be celebrated and then it acts as motivation to peruse more of these accomplishments no matter how small.  If your workout doesn’t require anything from you but showing up then the rewards will soon dry up and so will the progress. Set a goal that you’ll need to work towards to achieve and it will make that sense of accomplishment easier with every session as you move closer towards your goal.

 4 – ENJOY THE JOURNEY NOT THE RESULTS – Too many times we get caught up with the results of working out, (myself included). We know what we want to look like, feel like, be like and we think once we obtain that all our problems will be solved. Once we get there we think we’ll be content. We’ll be happy. Often its not the case. Surround your self with an environment (people, places, trainers) that make you feel good and challenge you each and every session along the way.

When this occurs the training and the experience becomes the focus not the end result. Don’t get me wrong setting goals is a priceless tool we use to motivate us and keep us accountable but you have to enjoy the process just as much as the destination.

When you read through each step and you feel that these points resonate with you and your current situation don’t freak out. With the fitness industry being so diverse we are extremely lucky that there are countless opportunities for us to throw ourselves into. Some may be good, some may be bad, but you’ll eventually find one that you are excited to get out of bed for at 5.30am… Or maybe not. But you might be itching to get there straight after work.

MAKE EXERCISE A PLEASURE, NOT A CHORE!

We find that one of the main things people get out of training here at RevoPT is their sense of enjoyment. It’s because of the unique supportive and friendly environment we have created.

If you want to experience it, we’d love to see you here. Book in for your first class for free here and I look forward to meeting you soon. 🙂

Book your free class here.

8

Jun

5 Efficient Ways to Burn Visceral Fat

Image result for visceral fat

Fat has become one of the most common results of bad lifestyle choices and habits. Modern people are trapped in their offices, in front of their screens, or in their cars while commuting to and from work, while their diets usually consist of fast food, lots of sugar, sodium, or a number of various other unhealthy options, and all this inevitably leads to overweight and obesity. However, there are two kinds of fat, and there’s a big difference between them. One is subcutaneous, which means that it’s situated right under the skin, while the other is visceral, and it’s situated in the abdominal cavity, around the internal organs. Visceral fat, also known as belly fat, is more dangerous as it’s associated with an increased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic issues. Here are a few suggestions about how to get rid of it.

Lifestyle changes

Albert Einstein once said that we can’t solve a problem by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. A few fundamental lifestyle changes can make a tremendous difference and help you eliminate abdominal fat. Physical activity is a must, and without it all your other efforts will be in vain. Make an appointment with your physician and go for a medical check-up to establish your fitness level. There are numerous workouts efficient for burning visceral fat, but it’s also important to select high-quality fitness clothing in order to feel comfortable and avoid injuries during exercising. To cut the long story short, forget about sitting in front of your TV with a pizza, surfing the internet for hours and gorging yourself on fast food and candy. But first of all, you need to be persistent and willing to make a shift towards a healthier lifestyle.   

Stick to lean protein 

Image result for skinless chicken

Skinless chicken and turkey breast is the kind of food that will keep you full and reduce your appetite. Did you know that the process of digesting and metabolizing protein requires the most energy? In other words, your body will burn more calories in order to digest protein than it burns in order to digest any other ingredient. A high protein intake is your most reliable ally in preventing late-night snacking, which is the most dangerous behavior that contributes to gain weight and visceral fat formation. Of course, this refers only to unhealthy “snaccidents” when you polish off a pint of ice cream or a plate of brownies.

Eat good carbs

Believe it or not, but there are carbs that aren’t bad guys. Don’t get your hopes high just yet, as we’re not talking about sweets and other guilty pleasures. Fibers are, actually, carbs that can’t be digested, and they just pass through your body. Their role is to control sugar levels, as well as your appetite. Still, it’s good to know that there are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble. The former can help you trim your belly fat, which means that you should stock up on oatmeal, apples, lentils, blueberries, beans, or nuts, and eat them on a regular basis. According to a study, a 10% daily increase in soluble fiber results in a 3.7% lower risk of piling on belly fat. Insoluble fiber also plays a significant part in the sense that it gives you the energy to exercise longer and at a greater intensity, so it’s important to include brown rice, legumes, carrots, whole wheat bread and tomatoes in your diet.

Drink green tea

This beverage is highly recommended for getting rid of visceral fat, as well as for losing weight in general. People who exercise and drink a lot of green tea are 87% more likely to trim visceral fat. A research study has found that high doses of green tea aqueous extract can prevent accumulation of visceral fat. Besides that, its antioxidants are known for reducing the risk of certain types of cancer, including ovarian, breast, and prostate. Of course, don’t forget that water is crucial for weight and fat loss, so make sure that you drink it, too.

Go green

Image result for all green salad

Certain vegetables are rich in water and low in calories, which is a great combo for burning visceral fat. Who doesn’t enjoy guacamole? Luckily, avocado is one of the superfoods that should find its place on your plate. Packed with good, monounsaturated fats, this delicious fruit will control your cravings, help you maintain normal body weight, and melt your love handles. Asparagus acts as a diuretic, which means that it eliminates excess water from your body and relieves bloating. This vegetable contains inulin, a type of fiber, that prevents constipation and keeps your gastrointestinal system running like clockwork. Kale is an underestimated and neglected vegetable, although its benefits are numerous. It controls the levels of sugar and it’s brimming with vitamin A, riboflavin, and vitamin B6, all of which are responsible for energy metabolism.

As you can see, there are numerous healthy substitutes for fast and processed foods which are delicious and effective for getting rid of visceral fat.

Luke is a fitness and health blogger at Ripped.me and a great fan of the gym and a healthy diet. He follows the trends in fitness, gym and healthy life and loves to share his knowledge through useful and informative articles.

1

Jun

How strength training has saved me from a crippled spine.

I was a pretty scrawny little kid.

I was always skinny and athletic. Never sat still.

You could count my ribs pretty well throughout my whole childhood. My mum and dads grocery bill however would prove that I ate like a horse. I just didn’t sit still for too long.

As I reached my early teens however my mum started to express concern around my spine and my under developed musculature of my upper back.

I had extremely winged scapular so physiotherapy was sort out for me to begin the process of strengthening my scapular and the muscles of my upper back and shoulders to better hold my posture in place.

Later on it was noted that I had some significant scoliosis as well. Nothing serious enough for drastic intervention to be made but enough for some treatment to be had.

Personally, I was never too concerned about either and went about being my healthy, happy, million miles and hour kid/teen. I played a lot of sport, my focus particularly on footy.

When I turned 16 I got my first gym membership. I’ve always had a part time job since I was able to work, so getting myself into the gym was something that if I made a priority, it was my call and my parents would always support my decisions.

Beach weights were the flavour for a 16 year old teenager. Naturally! I trained with one of my closest childhood friends.

We seemed to make a bit of progress in the gym and although we were working our hardest on our ‘Beach muscles’, through some good guidance we managed to stay pretty well balanced with our bodies.

As time progressed I actually ended up starting my career in the fitness industry at that very gym!

15 years later (wow!) I am now focusing predominately within my own training on Olympic Weightlifting. This is actually a sport where being mobile, yet strong is a huge benefit. I have some aspiration on competing soon and have started to post some numbers that I am a little proud of after around 2 years of focusing on this style of training as my priority. Here are a couple of recent PB’s I have managed after working closely with my coach, Lester Ho, on my individual strengths and weaknesses.

I am a washed up local level footballer with an injury list longer than I should bore you with here. The most serious of which being a shoulder reconstruction after a series of football related dislocations.

I train hard, but also look after my body regularly with massage, physiotherapy treatment when needed and regular visits to my osteopath, particularly over the last 18 months.

Recently my Osteopath and I were discussing my joint hypermobility. I am and have for most of my life been quite flexible. Something that I thought my time in the gym focusing on this type of flexibility work had brought about. It was not something that I thought was typically un-common. Just something I thought I had brought about with diligence.

This is kinda how I feel after a solid strength training session. 😉

However, my spine in particular is very mobile.

This is not necessarily a good thing.

So, what is hypermobility?

Joint hypermobility syndrome is a condition that features joints that easily move beyond the normal range expected for a particular joint. The joint hyper-mobility syndrome is considered a benign condition. It is estimated that 10%-15% of normal children have hypermobile joints or joints that can move beyond the normal range of motion. Hypermobile joints are sometimes referred to as “loose joints,” and those affected are referred to as being “double jointed.”

Being more mobile and having more range of movement means your joints are also more unstable. When you are working toward snatching more than your body weight over your head, you must do this with the right preparation and caution as it can create issues with your shoulders, hips, spine and even elbows if done incorrectly.

However I now know that my time in the gym and my active lifestyle since I was young has probably prevented me from being a crippled mess at the age of 33.

Whilst I have suffered the odd impact based injury like my shoulder reconstruction my spine is in incredible shape (according to my osteopath anyway) for someone as mobile as I am.

You see, all of the resistance training I have been putting my body through since I was 16 has helped to transform myself from a skinny kid with winged scapula to a reasonably well developed strong father (#dadstrong not #dadbody).

In fact, the joint trauma injuries and hypermobility might make a little more sense retrospectively. If my shoulders weren’t as mobile as they were, traumatic injuries brought about by impact like my shoulder dislocations might have been a little less likely.

So after this very long winded introduction to my condition and where i’m at now, if you’re someone who suffers from a similar condition should you just hit the weights hard and stiffen up?

Hell no!

Should you you start yoga and stretch out a heap whenever you’re stiff and sore?

Double hell no!

It’s about finding a balance between your mobility and building strength in the areas that you are lacking, especially strength in your end range/weakest point of the rep.

Many people with hypermobility natural are putting their bodies at more risk of joint related injuries as their connective tissue doesn’t provide them with as much rigidity as that of others. So many of them get stiff and sore regularly. Generally if people are stiff and sore regularly the common held belief if that something along the lines of yoga will assist to to stretch out… This is, in isolation, one of the worst things you can actually do.

It will only cause to further loosen of your slack connective tissue and put you at a greater risk of a ligament or joint injury through weak or sloppy support structures.

Yoga can be effectively added into a training regime for someone with hyper mobility but only if you are doing the things you need to do to become more stable in the areas of need. This can be a very individual thing.

Adding in more spine strengthening work such as pilates or any structural strengthening work can be the key. The more you learn about your body and the more aware you can become of how you move and where your restrictions and weaknesses lie, the better you can address them.

This little guy is now the main reason I want to keep myself fit, healthy and injury free.

For me, my shoulders, ankles and spine are both incredibly mobile, my hips however need a bit of work.

So for me, doing all I can do to strengthen my spine and a unit and the retractors of my scapular works well for me to become less prone to injury. Supporting the stabilising structure of my ankles is also a focus.

The exercises you want to look at mastering as a minimum are:

  1. The Deadlift
  2. Barbell Back Squat
  3. Strict Press
  4. Pendlay Row

Diligently focusing on what you need as an individual is the key to being fit, healthy and strong as you age no matter who you are. This can be incredibly individual. So if you’re wondering what you might need for yourself, specifically seek out the advice of a strength and conditioning coach who can first assess where you’re at and then design a structured training program to have you progress towards your goals.

Or get in touch. I can point you in the right direction and would love to hear from you.

Luke

3

May

26

Apr

19

Apr