15

Dec

My beautifully ugly obsession – The good, the bad & the ugly of Ironman Triathlon.

Shark – Bike – Bushfire – Run

Ironman Western Australia – Part 2, The Race Report

So here is, the race report for IM Western Australia.

I tried to keep it short, but the day was just so unbelievable that it was hard. The journey was one I’ll cherish forever. It has shown me strength I never knew I had. I hope you enjoy.

Its been nearly 2 weeks since the big day and I’m still trying to find the words to express how I feel about the whole experience.
It was such a whirlwind from the moment I left Melbourne right through to crossing that finishing line.

I can honestly say that once I hit the first stage of my taper, 2 weeks before the day, I was so proud and confident of what I had achieved over the past 6 months. I was proud of the commitment I had shown to my training, health and overall the whole process. To me getting through the months, weeks and days of training was the hard part. I knew that if I committed to the process, come race day, it would be the easy part.

The week leading in was pretty crusiey, work definitely kept my mind busy. Packing the long list of equipment for the event, then keeping up with short easy sessions to keep the body ticking over. It felt so good to see the body freshen up, to have this amazing fitness I was feeling ready and excited.

We left home for our flight to Perth bright and early on Thursday morning for our expected departure at 8:00am. While we jammed packed ourselves into the taxi; my partner Scott, Coach Katee and her husband Mick with all our luggage plus 3 bikes, we were pumped to go. On the way we all received a text message saying our flight has been delayed. Cool, no worries, 2 hours is nothing. Upon arrival at the airport when checking in we were then told our plane had mechanical issues and we were being redirect to Sydney with now a 4 hour delay. Not ideal, but ok what can you do. After getting through all that we sat down to enjoy our coffee when Scott received a text to state we were required to now board a flight to Canberra within 20mins of it leaving. WHAT! After confusion and no answers as to why we were headed there, we were on our way. No word of what was happening with our luggage. We landed in Canberra and still they were unable to tell us what was going on, other than we weren’t flying to Perth until 7:00pm.

So 10 hours now to burn in the Australian Capital Territory.
I remember reading in my notes on my training program the instructions for Thursday were to keep cool, hydrated and off my feet. Turns out we spent the day touring around on our feet and very stressed as we still didn’t know where the luggage was.

A phone call from my coach when she had landed in Perth (the flight we were supposed to be on also) made my day. She was standing at the conveyer belt in Perth with our bags and Mick had collect my bike. PHEWWW!!!

Finally boarding the plane to Perth, we were delayed another hour. Ahh what the hell is another hour hey?! Scott and I finally made in to our motel in Perth at 1:00am.

Friday we made the 3 hour trip down to Busselton, south of Perth. I just couldn’t wait to get there. As soon as we arrived I was straight down to the expo to check myself in. This was like no other check in I’ve experienced. As I was a ‘first timer’ the beautiful volunteer called out to the others and next thing they are all cheering and ringing their cow bells. It was an incredible feeling. They too were as excited as me. I signed my life away, got weighed and was on my way. Straight to the merchandise tent. Quick look through we then went to check out the famous jetty. It was BEAUTIFUL! Just like the photos. The vibes around the town were amazing, I’ll never forget it.

That afternoon a few of us went for a quick spin on our bikes to check they were all good from the flight and to have a quick look over the bike course. It was my first taste of the imfafous Busselton wind. Boy it was strong. But hey, I had plenty of training in wind. That wasn’t going to make me worried.

Saturday was a busy day. Our Tri club, Holistic Endurance got together to do a swim, ride and run. The water was stunning, seeing star fish, turtles, sting rays and even a dolphin swimming underneath us. The water was cool, calm and clear. I couldn’t wait to be out there swimming around the jetty. Off on our ride, it was hot already. Again an insight into what we would be facing on Sunday. A chance then to run on the course, along the coast. Not only did this help settle the nerves but it also made the fire in my belly burn big for what was about to come.

After what felt like forever packing all my gear in to appropriate bags, one allocated for all my bike gear the second for my run gear. Plus two bags for special needs that would I would have access to on the bike and run course if i needed. We set off to drop my beloved bike and gear into transition.

From there outside it was like trying to find a needle in a hay bail, there were bikes everywhere! I loved seeing so many people wanting to achieve the same thing I did. Transition is actually very carefully organised, numbered and labelled. The time spent in transition I was able to visualise how it was going to work, where to enter, where to exit. Also have I mentioned how amazing the volunteers are? They were everywhere being so helpful.
After that, everything was completed there was nothing else to do other than relax. Everything was done. Such a strange feeling, something I had been waiting to feel for such a long time. This was it.

A quick visit to see the boss Luke and his family who had flown over to spectate (how cool is that but the way) definitely helped distract me from what could happen on Sunday. Chatting about the whole process of what we had been through and what lay ahead of me, it was such a good time to reflect.

It certainly was an early night for me, I was always curious if I’d get much sleep the night before and Ironman, as in past before previous events, this has not been the case. Turns out I slept like a log!

Waking up at 4:00am, the day was FINALLY here. I remember Scott turning over and saying “Its your Christmas Day.” He was so right, everything I has dreamed about doing was about to unfold.

Well at least I thought it was…

We arrived at the the event and there were people everywhere! I walked straight into transition and dropped all my food, water/electrolytes off at my bike. All was good. I then started hearing announcements being made over the speaker that there had been a shark sighting at the jetty. WHAT THE HELL! Were they serious? Surely not, surely they would scare it off and we would be on our way, this is my Ironman Day. When no announcements had been made the vibes in transitions were getting worse, people talking about what might or might not happen. All we were told was to stay at our bikes until further notice. I remember looking down at my watch and it was nearly 7:00am (our start time) and starting to get anxious, this was our start time we should be in the water, how I thought the day would unfold wasn’t going to plan.

We were finally told that the swim was NOT going ahead. I was honestly devastated! Surely the shark would leave once we all started?

So new plan, we would start on the beach front and every 6 seconds, 2 people were allowed to start. This was to ease the congestion in transition and on the roads. My friend and I waited out in the sun for over an hour. That sun was beaming down on us, it was hot and I was beginning to get hungry. This didn’t make me feel positive at all. I made a new plan for my nutrition, for when I finally got to my bike. 2 hours after our original start time I was out on the bike, it was now 9:00am.

This was the best feeling ever getting out there, we had finally started. I was doing an Ironman.
The first 90km I was having the time of my life, speed was good, nutrition and hydration perfect. I was back to the 90km turn around point in no time. Seeing Scott an my best friend Sara was the best feeling ever. It was definitely heating up though, I was collecting water bottles at each aid station and pouring it over my head, face and back to try and keep cool.

There is about 20km on the bike where I have no recollection of what happened. What I do remember is looking down at my Garmin and it said 110km, from that point on I was in trouble. I started to feel really sick in the stomach. My water was hot, my food melting. Nothing I put in my mouth was satisfying me. I still had 70km to go.

Approaching the 135km mark I start to see a lot of smoke coming from a fire, I thought to myself how strange it was that they were allowed to burn off on such a hot day?! As I came closer to the 135k turn around, someone was calling my name. I couldn’t make out who it was, I was starting to feel so delusional. First I thought it was Scott, it couldn’t be. As I got closer I could see it was my boss Luke and his wife Lisa. They were cheering so loud for me, I was thinking so myself, stop cheering, stop it. As I turned the point I looked over to Lisa and told her I was really sick. She could see it in my face that this was not one word of a lie.

Little did I know that the smoke I had seen earlier was coming from an out of control bush fire. It was headed very close to the bike course. The heat it was projecting towards us was unbearable. Later I found out that it clocked 40 degrees out on those roads.

Nothing improved on the bike, passing aid stations to collect water bottles that were just as hot as the ones I already had. It had nearly been 1.5 hours with me vomiting and unable to keep anything in. I had vomited all over myself, over my bike, still riding. This was bad. I pulled over and this beautiful man stopped to ask if I was ok, he could see I was unwell. I didn’t know what I needed, nothing was working. He offered to get the ambulance, I knew that if he did get them, my day was done. I wasn’t ready to quit yet. I managed to tell him I needed to get back to transition. That was now my goal, it was all I could focus on. He told me to get on my bike and follow him back. So I did. His direction was what I needed, I was unable to make a rational decision. I was finally making my way back to what I thought was transition. In the distance I could see my coach and other athletes from Holistic Endurance, cheering for me like crazy. Again in my mind I was telling them to stop, I was failing, don’t be happy for me! I pulled in as I thought it was transition, got off my bike I was really distressed as I could not cool myself down. I felt like I was cooked from the inside out. I explained what had happened as best I could, I didn’t know what to do. This part is a bit of daze to me, but I remember Coach Katee saying to me, the choice to continue was mine and she would support me with whatever I decided. The look in her eyes, I knew it wasn’t good. She gave me a bottle of crisp mineral water that was so cold that I wanted to skull, but knew I had to sip or it would come up. She also gave me very clear instructions what to do next. To get to transition, cool down by standing under the hose, eat and drink something. And most importantly, that I had this!

I got to transition and Scott was there on the sideline, I couldn’t even look at him, I was so disappointment with myself, I knew I had let him, my coach myself and everyone back home down. I hated this! The volunteers took my bike and I wobbled over to the guy with the hose and I stood there while he sprayed me down from head to toe. This was heaven. I walked over to get my run bag and got organised. The volunteers gave me iced water and help me put it down the back of my top and under my cap. Part of me didn’t want to run, how could I possible get through a marathon? I had been vomiting the past 2 hours. I remember looking around and there were girls everywhere looking as sick as I was. Some vomiting, some crying, some encouraging us saying we could do it. One girl close to me was hysterical, she was so distressed with the whole situation. It actually made me feel uncomfortable. I had to get out there and at least try. I walked out and again got hosed down with water, then spotted a familiar face. Mick (coach Katee’s husband) he had followed me in since seeing me get off the bike. I can’t remember exactly what he said, but I know it was encouraging. Katee and him both believed in me that I could at least try.

So I did, off I went. Out on the run! The crowd along the beach as just insane. The vibes they were giving me made me forget about the past 6 horrendous hours, I was doing this. I was going to give it my all. They were cheering my name, hi fiving and running alongside me. An incredible experience. I got to the first aid station where I took a piece of watermelon, it was the best tasting watermelon I’ve ever had. Finally something that my body would take! The next thing I knew I was passing through more and more aid stations. One of my favourite parts of the run was seeing Katee and the HE crew, I was smiling (and probably crying) I could see the joy in them that I hadn’t given up. I was doing this. It gave me so much strength to keep pushing.

I then saw another another spectator/friend Paul who was on this bike motivating us along the path. He rode alongside me for what felt like eternity. Constantly checking in, telling me to pick it up. He distracted me from the pain I was in. My body was hurting and I was still burning hot.

The minutes, the hours and the KM’s passed, the sun was setting and I was just focusing on the next thing. Get to the aid station, pass that KM. The tiniest goals, felt like the biggest. But ticking them off gave me more strength, it was rewarding. I needed to keep distracted.

On the final 3km of the run I could see a friend ahead, Shelly. I’ve know her as long as I’ve been in the triathlon world, she was walking. I needed to get to her. I did, I told her we had to get to the finish line, we were nearly there. We ran/walked that last 2km before finally hitting the beginning of the finishing shoot. We were there.

I cannot explain the thrill of it, running down that red carpet, lights flashing, the tunes pumping, people cheering for me! I wanted to stop and just watch, take it all in. I wanted this moment to last forever, but I also wanted this whole experience to end. I was hurting.
I could see my name on the top of the finish line banner, Pete Murray calling my name. It was everything I had imagined, however the feelings were 100% sweeter. I had finished. I did it!

A volunteer grabbed me and asked if I was ok, I had no idea if I was. I could see Scott, Katee and the support crew by the sideline, they gave me my finishers towel and walked over to them. Katee had my medal and she out it over my head and hugged me.

I had finished, it was over.

By this stage I was very emotional, seeing everyone so happy for me. I was so happy for me. I have never felt so proud of myself, than what I was feeling in that moment. I had beaten all the demons in my head, I had delt with all the curveballs that were thrown to us, I had overcome the thought that I was going to give up while out on the bike. But, I didn’t.

I DID IT!

It was hard to comprehend what had happened across the day, the sharks, the bushfire, the heat. Everything was/is a blur. But I know I am so pound of myself for finishing what I had started.

The following day it was important to debrief. I had said I was never doing it again. That I was done. After many chats and reminiscing, I found out that over 700 athletes (from 2,600 including the 70.3 athletes) pulled from the event. That someone hit a kangaroo on the bike (could this be anymore Australian). That temperature were much higher than what was predicted, much higher, 36 by 12:00pm.

That the conditions we were faced with were very challenging, some saying worse than Kona.
This helped me not be so hard on myself, sure my times were slower than anticipated, but I did the day as best as I could. I nailed the training leading in and looking back, it was the experience of a life time.

So my response has now changed when people ask if I’ll do it again. From “never again,” to “Cya in May at Cairns Ironman.”

I want to experience the whole thing, swim, bike and run. I will not stop to I am an Ironman.

So, my quest to become an Ironman continues.

I CAN AND I WILL BE AN IRONMAN

7

Dec

Fun or Fitness?

Here’s how you can have both (& more).

When I was thinking about my second contribution to the RevoPT Blog many topics seemed to come into my head. I’d write the first paragraph and find myself stalled. I wondered why, as I’d found my first experience writing quite easy (with some help editing/reviewing).  If you’re interested in checking it out you can find it here: Get your head right to get your body right.

Suddenly, during a chat with a mentor of mine, it hit me.  I was trying to be guided by the industry and what I thought people needed to know, not what I wanted to say.  This lead me to question my personal journey and where I wanted to take it in 2018.

The reflection process that followed produced the content you’re now reading, ‘Fun or Fitness? Why not both.’, I have battled this question ever since I moved to Melbourne.  Trying to constantly find a balance between enjoying myself and looking after myself.  I’d be lying if I said I have always prioritised the latter.  More recently however I have found myself struggling to stick to a ‘training routine’, ‘weekly plan’, ‘fitness regime’, all things I thought were a poor reflection of myself as a personal/group trainer and coach.  Reviewing my past month, I wanted to prioritise my time so I could focus on four key areas which I highlighted would help me lead a more fulfilling lifestyle; enjoyment (fun), movement (health), challenges (motivation) & environment (support).

ENJOYMENT –

This underpins why we should undertake a task.  We need to make sure what we are doing whether it be training, working or socialising is prioritised by enjoyment.  This is about the development of positive association with these tasks which are important for positive lifestyle and personal wellbeing.  Cooking is the first example of this that I can think of that many of us, myself included, can struggle with but it’s something that can have a huge impact on not only what we eat but our energy levels, quality of sleep, joint & muscle health and many more.  Setting aside time to cook is often hard because we see it as another task, but we don’t think outside the square to make any positive association.  Some things I’ve done to make sure I cook but don’t get bogged down include; play music, listen to podcasts, watch videos on YouTube or (and this is a hard one) get my house mates involved for some team work/bonding.

Another example of prioritising enjoyment through your fitness journey would be the inclusion of yourself to a group or team.  Therefore, I love the small group training environment RevoPT can provide people.  Get to know others around you, to celebrate with them as you and they achieve their goals.  If this doesn’t appeal to you then look at joining a team.  Personally, both environments have provided great enjoyment to me and I always make sure to join in where and when I can, especially within my friendship group if there is an opportunity to play social sports games, what better way to stay fit than by having fun with your friends?!

MOVEMENT –

It’s commonly understood that movement each day is good for our health.  However, the guidance around what exercise to do for what benefits is all dependent upon who you talk to and sometimes when you talk to them (trends are prevalent within the industry).  Perhaps we have overcomplicated it? Simply some days I feel better just for a light walk, solid stretch or informal movement of my body into positions which it feels good or happy.  This comes with practice and developing a connection to understand your body better.  Some days I know I don’t feel up to training and I used to force myself to do something in the gym (but why?).  Then one day I decided why not just go for a run? (sun is also important!)  The next week, I encountered the same problem.  So, I did some bodyweight exercises in my backyard.  Then come week 3 I found myself just at times incorporating simplistic movement on my off days, the ‘rest days’, sometimes finding myself staying in positions for up to a minute or two.  These positions would then leave me feeling better and left me with a greater respect of the principle time under tension.

I think, for a portion of time, that my ability to listen to the body and what it needed with regard to movement was compromised.  I felt like it wanted to do something but maybe not 50 calories on the bike or 50 reps of a back squat.  I’ve found myself feeling better throughout the second half of the year and I put this down to not having set ‘workout’ or set ‘rest’ days.  I let my mind and body decide each new day what we are going to do and I’m much better for it.  This doesn’t mean I do not train hard, I believe I am now training smarter and more specifically.  The three things I would encourage everyone to do when looking at their movement are; establish intent, body awareness and time under tension.

CHALLENGES –

These are designed to keep us motivated and on our toes.  Ready for whatever might come up each day.  Whilst being mindful of stress and placing importance on relaxation when required, it’s important that we stay sharp and I’ve found challenging myself no matter how big or small, mental or physical helps me to do this.  Some of the challenges I’ve set myself through 2017 have been; writing my first (& second) blog entries, Rowing 500m <1.30, Ski Erg 2km <7.30, Bench Press 100Kg (maybe next year), Clean & jerk 100Kg, Snatch Bodyweight (maybe next year), expanding my network/career (VFLW S&C coach) and 20 mins mobility each day (almost!).  So, as you can see we can’t always get what we want and you can’t do everything.  The key here is that you can try!  Some challenges you will fail, some you will succeed but it becomes more about setting them and finding out more about who you are, what you enjoy and all you are capable of.

Whilst you might not be successful in every challenge at least you can say you tried, you trained, and you committed to it.  Those three things are more important to leading a positive fitness journey than the result itself.  The other thing I do regarding my challenges is talk to people who I know have tried and I gauge my sense of reality.  Sometimes this can show I’m overly ambitious and at times not capable but without having these conversations I wouldn’t know.  The same as without trying to complete these challenges I would not have known if I was capable or learnt the lessons that I have.  Don’t be afraid to challenge yourself, be excited to explore what you are capable of both inside and outside the gym.

ENVIRONMENT –

This is my final point but arguably most important. To make sure we feel positive about whatever it is we do we must ensure we surround ourselves with the right environment.  This is different for all individuals but for me I’m more inclined to read/write/study if it’s raining, eat veggies if it’s cold, fruit if it’s warm and I’m more inclined to exercise if the sun is out.  These are all examples of the natural environment but what about the area around you?  Are you more inclined to exercise if you feel safe? if you have someone to talk to? Short and sweet, RevoPT get the results we do due to the environment we provide.  Our environment is inclusive, positive and results driven.  We provide everyone with the opportunity to better themselves, are constantly giving constructive feedback, tips to guide people and encouragement to keep you working yourself to your best and we provide the structure to let you track your progress and keep on updating your goals.   However, we make sure you get lots of variety to keep the environment interesting, fun and fresh.  All of this key to providing you with enjoyment, movement and challenges.

Another example of a fantastic environment is the Victoria University (Western Bulldogs) Women’s Football Program. I’ve never been a part of a club that is made up of individuals that are driven and united from the top down.  They’ve set an incredible example for me regarding work ethic, honesty and trust.  Three key pillars which I believe help foster the environment that I am now lucky to be part of as Strength and Conditioning coach.  So why am I mentioning this and how do these three pillars relate to the everyday person and their journey in search for the right environment.  Work ethic will be improved if you are surrounded by people you respect and people who respect you so keep an eye out for this and next time you think ‘I’m going to beat this person’ remind yourself that it’s their effort lifting your work ethic, this is a great sign you’re in a good environment (competition is healthy).  Honesty should be able to be applied from both your trainers and yourself.  We should be able to push you harder if we think you’re capable of more.  You should be honest with us if there’s something you’re not enjoying or if you know you can’t give absolutely everything.  Having an honest relationship with the trainers at your gym will make for a more enjoyable experience.  Finally, trust is super important in your environment.  Trust that you’re safe, you’re doing what’s required to meet your goals and that you’re always welcome at the gym.

To summarise the above I guess this is my personal reflection on my past couple of working years in Melbourne.   Something I encourage you to all do is REFLECT then RESPOND.  My quote when I started my RevoPT journey was ‘change is the best thing you can do’.  I stand by this as I believe change comes in many forms and can provide all of the above-mentioned keys to a good journey to a stronger, fitter and healthier version of yourself.  Change can lead to increased enjoyment, different ways of including movement, provide challenges and give you a fresh environment to come to each day.

None of us are perfect and nor should we aim to be, however this should not leave us in a place where we don’t strive to be enjoy, move, challenge and be in a great environment each day.  We can make the choices to make sure this happens and it all starts from taking away these finals points from this blog.


ENJOY- what you are doing and where your journey takes you.

MOVE- listen to how your body feels and move with it! Be conscious in what training or movement you think it requires.

CHALLENGE- the sky is the limit, the world your oyster.  Look at the small and the big picture. We can take on a challenge each day.

ENVIRONMENT- find the one that makes you enjoy, move and challenge yourself!

Congratulations on your 2017, celebrate it but get ready. 2018 can be anything you want it to be, it’s up to you!

Have a great holiday season and enjoy the company of those around you,

Nathan

1

Nov

So you wanna be an Ironman?

What the hell even is an Ironman? Well I’m here to give you a little insight into what is is and how my little project is coming along!

The definition;

Iron Man

noun

  • (Especially is a sporting context) an exceptionally strong or robust man
  • A multi event sporting contest demanding stamina in particular a triathlon involving swimming, cycling and running.

Cheers Google, fairly accurate.

However in my quest to become an Ironman, through conversations with my non-triathlon affiliated friends/family/clients I’ve been called far from the above, more close to the following:

  • Addicted
  • Crazy
  • Insane
  • Inspiring
  • Committed

I’ve been looked up and down with a strange look on people’s face, as if to say – You?! How?!

I’ve had people say that I don’t have a typical triathletes body type.

I’ve been told that they are extremely expensive.

Mostly commonly I get asked why? Why would you want do that?!

These comments and questions are also somewhat accurate.

So here is what I believe Ironman is all about…

The breakdown of the day, 3.8km swim, 180km bike & 42.2km run. Easy as that right? Well I’d like to say yes, but I truly believe that the day will be the easier part, its the months of training, recovering, eating, sleeping and working to pay for the event that has been the hard part.

The decision to undertake my first Ironman was decided well over a year before the actual race date. It was never a dream of mine as a kid to do one, in fact I never had interest at all to do one when I started in triathlon nearly 3 years ago. I had no desire what so ever to do one.

Until…. Well I guess I was surrounded by more and more people who were training for them. I had been on various training camps where people had shared their Ironman story with me. My coaches often referred to them, it just seemed to be around me more and more. The more I heard about them the more I became fascinated with them. The distances for each discipline, the preparation that is required, the dedication, I wanted to know more. I read many blogs about pros and age groupers completing them, some good, some not so good. Every time I read more, heard more, a part of me wanted to experience this. I wanted to call myself an Ironman.

It wasn’t until around this time last year, when many of the athletes I train alongside were weeks away from toeing the line to complete their first Ironman when I made a commitment to myself that it would be me their the following year. I was going to do Ironman Western Australia. This made my body tingle! I couldn’t believe I was going to be doing this.

From that moment it has basically never left my mind, I think about it every day.

‘If you can’t stop thinking about it, don’t stop working for it’ And thats what I did.

I knew I needed a tribe of people to work with me to help me get prepared.

In my mind I made a list of important people who I needed on board to allow this to happen.

So first stop was my darling boyfriend, Scott. We were out for dinner and I was like a nervous school girl. He was on his phone when I said I had something to ask, his face instantly looked worried. I told him I wanted to do an Ironman. With a relieved look, he responded ‘Your going to be so tired’, followed by if thats what you want to do, go for it’.

His support means the world to me, knowing he will be at the finish line makes me so happy.

Next up was my boss Luke Scott. Training for Ironman while working full time doesn’t allow for much else. I needed to no I had his support, that he understood what I was committing to. Of course he was fully on board and has shown great interest throughout the whole process. Again knowing Luke and his family are travelling over to watch gives me motivation to keep pushing throughout each week.

Last but not least was my amazing coach, Sarah. I was super excited to tell her my new goal but also part of me was nervous to know what her reaction was going to be. Of all people, Sarah was going to know if I was capable of doing this. She was so supportive with the whole thing. Very real and honest. Something I believe needs to happen between us when preparing for an event like this.

With my tribe on board, I was good to go. From that point in time, everything I was doing was building into Ironman. Over the weeks my training has slowly started to increase across all disciplines. Three weeks of slowly building up then an adaptation week which is a week with decreased volume. It still amazes me how the human body adapts to progressive training. As a PT I see this all the time but training for Ironman has amplified this. Long rides starting at around 2-3 hours on the weekend, to now 5+ hours with a run and swim and the body just copes!

Some days are definitely harder than others. There are days I just want to go home and sleep for hours. But time is just so crucial.  As part of my build I raced a half Ironman up at the Sunshine Coast, the race was pretty awful, it wasn’t a reflection of the hard work I had put in. It still gives me shivers thinking about it. But after experiencing such a crappy race it has fuelled many of my sessions where I have felt like skipping them.

I am not sitting at around to 4.5 weeks out and I’m right in the middle of my final build, also known as Peak Week. Over the next 2 weeks I will complete the most amount of training I have ever done in my life. Im I am loving every minute of it! I am so thrilled with how my training is going. My goals throughout Iroman was to keep my body injury free. This is the biggest commitment I’ve ever done and I wanted to give myself the best possible chance. I truly believe the 1 percenters outside of the swim, bike, run training have been what has helped keep my body ticking over. Sleep, my number one priority to ensure I recover well. This can be a tricky one at times, but majority of the time is pretty good. Mobility pre and post sessions to help prepare my body for long sessions. Regular massage to eliminate and tightness that occurs from the repetitive motions. Acupuncture and yoga to balance my body out and help keep my hormones happy. (Game changer for me).

I believe strength training has truly helped keep my body together. I have come from a strength training background so always found I have been relative strong, whereas endurance does not come easy for me, I’ve had to work hard and be consistent. It’s the regular heavy strength training while being consistent with Ironman training that is what has helped me get this far injury free. I feel like over the years of building my endurance base while keeping up with my strength training is what has kept me robust. I definitely have experienced niggles here and there, but identifying them early and keeping on top of them has been crucial. Last but not least, good nutrition. Knowing what will fuel me pre and post sessions to allow me to keep trucking along. I’ve become aware of the foods I perform well off and those that don’t. I feel the fittest and strongest I’ve ever been!

Weeks ago when people asked me how I was going with my training and if I felt ready, I would always answer with uncertainty. I mean, it just felt like it was so far away. Now after some big weeks of training, I can really visualise it now. All those long sessions and 1 percenters are starting to come together.

Like I said earlier, I think it is so amazing how your body can adapt.

So when people call me crazy, addicted, insane, committed, inspiring I agree! I believe if you want to get through the process of an Ironman you require these attributes. The process has required me to make many, many sacrifices, some easy, some not so easy. There are times I feel so proud of what I’m doing but lately have felt selfish as my training is my priority at the moment, friends and family have been put to the side at times and this can be really hard. But knowing I have a bunch of amazing people supporting me through this journey has made those tough moments that little bit easier. I believe until your surround around by it, it can be hard for people to understand the time and effort that goes into the preparation. But I know that when I get to cross that finish line it will all be worth every one of those highs and low moments. The whole experience has been awesome.

So yes, I… Jaimie Lee Brown, JLB, the Bumble Bee will be an Ironman!

I cannot wait to share with you my race report, stay tuned!

6

Sep

Our top 4 tips to create a better relationship with exercise

When the alarm goes off or you knock off work what’s the first thought that crosses your mind?

There’s normally two:

– “Oh shit I have to workout now” or

– “Hell yeah I get to workout now!”

Which ever one it is for you know that it’s not going to change if you don’t change what you do.

The routine of decision making and the feeling that comes along with it in regards to a workout that you’ve planned is going to effect the workout positively or negatively. You set the tone for not only the feeling you get during each workout out but the overall outcome of you training.

Think of it like doing a presentation. How much more work are you going to put into it if you actually enjoy the subject that your working on? It’s the same principle for training and working out.

When you find something you enjoy doing the routine becomes easier and eventually the routine becomes a highlight of your day and the pressure to stay in the routine wears off. What takes it’s place is the PLEASURE of exercise and all the benefits that come with it.

As a personal trainer I take the pleasure of exercise for granted but from communicating with clients and members I’m staggered to find that so many people go to the gym, train or workout purely from a routine or chore perspective. Their mindset is “it’s what I should do” not “it’s what I want to do”.  This perspective drives a feeling of another box to tick for the day or responsibility that I have weighing me down.  These are the people I want to help see the light of connecting with exercise on a different level and changing the game.

STEPS TO MAKE THE TRANSITION

1 – Find something you ENJOY doing – Don’t get stuck on the stationary gym equipment, the body is made to move let it do its thing, the mindlessness of setting a machine for a set time and peddling away only to be snapped back awake by the cool down buzzer is doing very little for you physically and even less mentally and endorphins sitting waiting to be let loose will remain mostly dormant, which leads me to my next step.

2 – CHANGE YOUR ENVIRONMENT – You don’t have to keep doing what your doing now, if your training doesn’t challenge, inspire and interest you then change it! Don’t get caught in the rat race of exercises and scroll through social media envious of all the people that seem to love training, If you want to try a boxing class go and do it. If you want to try yoga or a pole dancing class book in and show up. It’s that easy, how will you not know what you love doing if you don’t try new things out. Don’t worry, everyone else in that class were first timers at some time too. My experience is that most people in the gym or in a class will be totally flattered if you ask for their help.

3 – CHALLENGE YOURSELF – Accomplishment is one of the most rewarding feelings you can have and in the gym environment this feeling should be celebrated and then it acts as motivation to peruse more of these accomplishments no matter how small.  If your workout doesn’t require anything from you but showing up then the rewards will soon dry up and so will the progress. Set a goal that you’ll need to work towards to achieve and it will make that sense of accomplishment easier with every session as you move closer towards your goal.

 4 – ENJOY THE JOURNEY NOT THE RESULTS – Too many times we get caught up with the results of working out, (myself included). We know what we want to look like, feel like, be like and we think once we obtain that all our problems will be solved. Once we get there we think we’ll be content. We’ll be happy. Often its not the case. Surround your self with an environment (people, places, trainers) that make you feel good and challenge you each and every session along the way.

When this occurs the training and the experience becomes the focus not the end result. Don’t get me wrong setting goals is a priceless tool we use to motivate us and keep us accountable but you have to enjoy the process just as much as the destination.

When you read through each step and you feel that these points resonate with you and your current situation don’t freak out. With the fitness industry being so diverse we are extremely lucky that there are countless opportunities for us to throw ourselves into. Some may be good, some may be bad, but you’ll eventually find one that you are excited to get out of bed for at 5.30am… Or maybe not. But you might be itching to get there straight after work.

MAKE EXERCISE A PLEASURE, NOT A CHORE!

We find that one of the main things people get out of training here at RevoPT is their sense of enjoyment. It’s because of the unique supportive and friendly environment we have created.

If you want to experience it, we’d love to see you here. Book in for your first class for free here and I look forward to meeting you soon. 🙂

Book your free class here.

9

Aug

The top 3 things you need to know to set your goals and achieve success.

RevoPT Trainer Jaimie is a long course triathlon competitor and an expert in how to set goals in both the long and short term to ensure that you will be successful.

She is a massive believer in following a process as it has helped her in her journey to become an Ironman athlete who trains with Holistic Endurance.

Jaimie believes that a goal is something that you can’t stop thinking about, something that motivates you every single day to get out of bed every morning to get it done!

We hope you read on and enjoy insight into goal setting and that it spurs you onto bigger things in your own life.

*Don’t miss the awesome bonus offer listed at the bottom of this post!

The three crucial steps in setting your goals.

1. Be a goal digger –

Setting goals helps you paint a clear picture of what you are wanting to achieve. However setting a goal needs to be done in a ‘smart’ way. That way you understand exactly what it is you want to achieve. Determining why you want to achieve a particular goal will be the underlining factor that is going to help keep you accountable, especially when things begin to get tough. Knowing your ‘why’ or ‘purpose’ for doing something can sometimes be tough to figure out, but once you do, your reasoning will be clear from the start of your training allowing you to pursue your goal unimpeded.  This will aid with motivation to ensure youreach your goal. When setting a goal its crucial to keep in mind the following-

Make It Specific: Who, What, Where, When, Why, Which – what exactly is it you want to achieve? Loose the fluff around what you want to do by making it specific. Instead of saying you want to lose weight, say ‘I want to lose 4kg’ Or instead of saying I want to get fit, define to yourself what fit actually means to you? Fit can mean many different things across the board, but if the definition of fit is clear to you then it is personal, therefore you are more likely to chip away at it.

Make it Measurable: From A to B – How can you measure your progress to keep you on track of reaching your goal? When setting a goal we need to have benchmarks during the process to keep us on track. These are generally smaller milestones which contribute to the end goal. For example, if your goal is to run a marathon, you might enter in a 5km or 10km and then onto a 21km fun run as part of training plan and progress.

Make It Achievable: How – Ensure your goal is reasonable, don’t set the standard so far out of reach that you begin to put too much pressure on yourself to get it done in such a short amount of time. Also give yourself credit, don’t set the standard to low for yourself so that it’s a walk in the park. Find that sweet spot.

Be Realistic: Worthwhile – Is this goal worthwhile doing for you? How are you going to feel after completing it? Making sure this goal is consistent with other factors in your life that will help support your short and long term plans. This part of your goal planning ties in perfectly with your ‘why’!

Be Timely: When – When do you want to have this goal achieved by? Make this concrete! Is it something that can be achieved within a week, month, year? Ensure you have given yourself sufficient time to do it but not also not cutting yourself to short with an unrealistic time frame.

2. Find your tribe –

‘Find your tribe and love them hard’ This is a very important when setting goals. By surrounding yourself with people who will help you achieve your goals or have the same interest as you will naturally lift you up and encourage you to keep on track. They are the people you can go to if things are getting tough, they will help push you in the right direction.

Like they say, you become more like the 5 people you spend the most time around. So surround yourself with the people who you want to be like. Then work your butt off.

Your goal will dictate your tribe. Some examples of people you may need in your tribe and how to find them include;

– Tell the world your goal; lets be honest the more people who know your goals the better. Having the support from family, friends, colleges is going to make the journey more successful. And you may even get people join you!

– Seeking a professional; having an expert in the field is going to accelerate the process. Having someone look over what you are doing is going to avoid a lot of the trial and error. Find someone who has already made the mistakes so you won’t need to. This also creates another layer of accountability when you have someone who is putting in just as much work into the equation as you are. They’ll help to keep you honest.

3. Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day –

Lets be real here, as much as we would love to have the greatest day EVERY day, there are going to be sessions, or times, or moments, days, or nights, even weeks (if we let it) where stuff just gets in the way. Where our plan of attack to crush our goals start to crumble. But hey, that’s just life, things happen that are completely out of our control. But what we do have control of is how we deal with it. Changing the way we see something can completely change our behaviour and emotion attached to our goal.

For example – work is really stressful and you miss multiple sessions that you have scheduled for the week. This can be frustrating as you are trying to make positive changes in your life. Instead of getting upset or frustrated about it, accept that work is busy, but because you missed the class, always keep a pair of runners in the car and put them on and get out the door for a 20min walk instead before you get home. It may not be a class at here at RevoPT, but at least you got out for a walk in the fresh air instead. You’ll feel much better than if you had done nothing at all. Plan the following day out so you are as prepared as possible and are able to leave work on time to get to the next class.

When things begin to really start to get tough, you may even begin to be questioning yourself. During this time it is really important to look back at your original goal and the reason ‘why’ you want to achieve it. What was the purpose of this goal. If the why is strong enough it will motivate you to keep on going and give you the strength to push these obstacles aside!

RevoPT Trainer: Jaimie-Lee Brown

For Jaimie-Lee, being fit is about finding balance. Having goals is great, but Jamie-Lee believes that health comes from more than PB’s and strict diets. It comes from training hard and resting well, making time for work and play and enjoying nutritious foods and naughty ones.

Growing up, Jaimie-Lee was never a keen runner and struggled to get through 5km. Now, she runs Marathons and competes in Triathlons.

Exercise has changed Jamie-Lee’s life. After spending years helping others find their best-self, she took the time to find her own and believes that’s a feeling everyone deserves.

You can learn a little more about Jaimie on her full personal trainer profile on our website here: revo.pt/jaimieleebrown

FREE GOAL SETTING COACHING

Reply directly to this email to request your FREE Goal setting appointment with Jaimie-Lee.

Jaimie will break down where you are at the moment and help you to develop a plane to help to get to where you need to be.

Don’t miss this opportunity to kick off your fitness journey with help from one of the best in the business.

We look forward to hearing from you.

27

Jul