14

Apr

4

Apr

The top 5 point for optimising your recovery from training.

You’ve started strong and are crushing your training but. How should you recover from exercise?

Have you ever woken up feeling really sore from your previous training session? Or maybe you have been sore for a whole week? We are going to look at some of the reasons why your body might not be recovering as well as it should and then look at ways to improve this.  Before we look at improving your recovery rate we need to understand why you are getting sore in the first place.

Why am I sore after a workout?

The technical term for post soreness is referred to as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), this soreness will often affect your ability to backup intense exercise sessions. This is often felt a day or two after a heavy bout of exercise. Simply put, DOMS occurs when you work your muscles harder than what they are used too. However that doesn’t mean that if you don’t pull up sore the next day that it has not been a good session, it’s all about the quality of a workout and the intention.

Research is inconclusive as to the exact mechanism of why DOMS occurs, however most studies show it appears to be the product of inflammation caused by microscopic tears in the connective tissue. So is this good or bad? In short, feeling sore and increasing muscle mass don’t necessarily go hand in hand. A little muscle damage is good and necessary for growth; however when DOMS causes a decrease in force production or negatively affects your motivation to work out, the disadvantages outweigh the benefits.

Effective recovery modalities can prevent DOMS from negatively affecting your training. There are a number of factors, including sleep, hydration, nutrition and sleep which affect your rate of recovery. So let’s look into these factors in further detail:

  1. What happens while I sleep?

Sleep normalises hormone levels required for recovery, with growth hormone and the sex hormones optimised – aiding in muscle repair. So rest is critical to the recovery process because while you’re resting, your body is building muscle. Sleep also plays a role in ‘resetting’ insulin resistance, aids the immune system and reduces inflammation. Without enough quality sleep, your body cannot fully recover from exercise and you will not allow your body to adapt to training (i.e reduce performance).

Should I train or rest?

High intensity training and lack of sleep skyrocket your cortisol levels, leading to overtraining and possible adrenal fatigue. In order words you cannot burn the candle at both ends – training hard and lack of sleep will not end well. So if you’re already sleep deprived and struggling to know whether to trade sleep for exercise, prioritise sleep and aim for just three workouts each week. Once you’re on a regular sleep schedule, you can increase the number and intensity of your workouts.

How much sleep do I need?

Everyone needs a different amount of sleep, so it’s important to get to know your body and figure out how much works for you.There are plenty of free apps which can help you track the length and quality of your sleep to get a better understanding of how much you really need. One that I like to use is sleep cycle. Tracking your sleep will help set a good routine of going to bed and waking up at a similar time each day. With enough sleep, you can be more productive, feel better all day long and put more intensity into your workouts.

  1. What and when should I be eating?

Ensure you are having a meal or snack within 30 mins post session that has a combination of protein and carbohydrates. The protein will assist with rebuilding the muscle and the carbohydrate component will replace glycogen levels stored in the muscle. Recovery snacks include, protein shakes, fruit and nuts, hard boiled eggs etc.

If you’re training in the morning… have a small snack 30 mins prior e.g fruit, museli bar, protein shake. If you are working out on an empty stomach you will not have any ‘fuel’ in the tank to push yourself hard.

If you’re training in the evening… ensure your nutrition is balanced throughout the day by eating a meal or snack every 3-4 hours that contains a combination of carbohydrates, fat and protein.

  1.  Should I exercise while I’m stressed?

Exercising after work can be a great way to unwind, however if it’s been a particularly stressful day your brain will be tired which will lead to physical fatigue, thus compromising your workout!  Exercising after the occasional harrowing day is unavoidable, but if you are chronically stressed, you could be affecting your fitness goals. A new study in the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology found that mental burnout significantly affected physical performance.  Another problem with exercising under stress is increasing your risk of injury. Research has shown that a high degree of major life stresses (moving, divorce, death of a family member, etc.) or a high amount of daily hassles (getting a flat tire or a speeding ticket etc.) can increase your risk for exercise injury. This is thought to result from attentional deficits and increased muscle tension.

  1.      How much water should I be drinking?

Water is the most vital component of your body and every single cell depends on it. We need water to help eliminate wastes and toxins, carry nutrients and oxygen to cells, help act as a cushion for your nervous system, keep joints lubricated, regulate our body temperature and, most importantly, keep body cells hydrated. Dehydration is a major predictor of fatigue during sustained high intensity exercise. Inadequate water intake results in thermal stress, low plasma volume, premature fatigue and other major markers of impaired recovery.

So how much should you be drinking to keep hydrated?

A common recommendation for adults is to drink 2.1-2.6 litres (8-10 cups) daily, but most experts agree it’s not possible to specify a quantity that is suitable for everyone.

Why? How much water you need depends on how quickly you are losing it from your body, and this is influenced by many factors including your health status, climate, how active you are, your age and what food and beverages you consume.

In normal environmental conditions, the turnover of water (via breathing, sweating, bowel and urine movements) in most adults is approximately 4 per cent of total body weight. This is equivalent to 2.5 — 3 litres a day in a 70kg adult. The food we consume contributes approximately 20 per cent (about 700-800 ml) of total water intake. So if you drink 2 litres of water each day, along with your normal diet, you typically replace the lost fluid. If you are bored of drinking plain old H20 try adding fruit or vegetables to your drink bottle. My favourite is cucumber water!

  1.      Rest days/deload weeks

How much should I be resting?

In order to maximise your performance it is imperative to have rest days, so this means complete REST to allow your body to recover.  In conjunction with rest days it is also important to have deload weeks, here at Revo PT we deload our classes every 8 weeks where the volume still remains high however the intensity is decreased. This not only allows the muscles to recover but also the nervous system. What happens in your body during recovery is vital for keeping yourself in the best possible health. If you want to make sure that your body is strong and you can perform at the highest level possible when you engage in physical activity, do what you can to facilitate recovery in your body.

When you are first starting out it is important that you give more body more rest as initially you will pull up quite sore due to DOMS (explained above). So perhaps starting off with 3 high intensity classes per week (and keep active during off days) and build from there. This is where you need to listen to your body and what is going to work best for you. If you are constantly sore then your body needs a rest day (or 2). Then you will find you come back fresh and ready to push yourself even harder! As your body adapts to high intensity loads you will be able to handle consecutive classes both physically and mentally.

Above all, listen to your body. When you feel good, go with it and when you need a rest, don’t feel bad for missing a day of training. You’ll come back stronger and get more out of your sessions if you find the right balance.

So train hard but do the right thing by your body by eating and hydrating regularly, consistent sleep patterns and minimal stress.

3

Apr

30

Mar

Long awaited Online Programming and Coaching now available

We are taking registrations of interest for our first initial intake for our online programming and coaching program.

This is a unique opportunity to work with our highly skilled and qualified coaches even if you don’t have the ability to head in to work with us here at the gym in South Melbourne.

This opportunity would be idea if you’re outside of Metropolitan Melbourne or if you’re someone who prefers training on your own rather than in a gym setting.

If you’re keen to be a part of our initial intake of only 10 individuals please get back to us immediately as this is an extremely limited first intake.

This limited intake will be able to take advantage of our unique Foundation membership 50% ongoing discount.

To take advantage of this foundation discount and lock in this ongoing rate head across to our online store via the links below and use the discount code: revoptonlinefoundationmember

Who will you be working with?

The coaches launching our online programming and coaching program are none other than Jaimie-Lee Brown and Nathan McCulloch.

Jaimie-Lee Brown: “Strength and happiness comes from finding balance.”

Before personal training, Jamie-Lee was a teacher for children with special needs.

While the classroom may seem worlds away from RevoPT, to Jamie-Lee they’re not so different.

In both roles, she helps people realise their best selves – something that takes patience, understanding, communication and trust.

She moved into training after using exercise as a personal stress-relief that offered mental and physical results. When people started asking her for advice, she knew she’d found a new career. With clients that range from their 20’s to their 70’s, Jamie-Lee doesn’t have a set training style. Her focus is on using your individual strengths and goals to create a tailored program that suits you.

You can read more about Jaimie Lee here: revo.pt/jaimieleebrown

Nathan McCulloch: “Change is the best thing you can do.”

Like most people who’ve completed the Overland Track, Nathan has a natural sense of adventure and it comes through in the way he trains.

He loves clients who don’t just enjoy a challenge, but provide them too.

Whether it’s requesting a new type of exercise or working around a physical limitation, Nathan believes that every session should be something you shape together. He’s flexible, relaxed and always open to new ways of working.

Nathan believes that change is the single best thing a person can do. It’s what saw him move from Tassie to Melbourne, complete a degree in Exercise and Sports Science, change his lifestyle and ultimately start a career in Personal Training.

You can read more about Jaimie Lee here: revo.pt/nathanmcculloch

Hear Jaimie and Nathan’s recent appearances on our podcast here:

  

 

 

 

Don’t forget that you can catch up with any of our post episodes of the podcast via:

The Apple Podcast App or

 

BASIC Membership Normally $30 Per Week

Our Foundation BASIC member special ONLY $15 per week ongoing. Offer ends April 30th 2017!

Our Basic coaching package is the ideal way to get started with your Coach

 

 

  • Customised goal setting
  • Daily custom programming
  • FitBot online account
  • Up to 7 emails weekly

Sign Up NOW here.

ADVANCED Normally $50 Per Week

Our Foundation ADVANCED member special ONLY $30 per week ongoing. Offer ends April 30th 2017!

Includes all of the services offered with our Basic Coaching Package PLUS:

  • 1 hour initial assessment
  • Regular phone contact
  • Regular email contact
  • Input from multiple coaches

Sign Up NOW here.

Take advantage of our Foundation member ongoing 50% off rate

To take advantage of this foundation discount and lock in this ongoing rate head across to our online store here via the links below and use the discount code: revoptonlinefoundationmember

3

Mar

RevoPT Mindset Training

What can I do right now to change my life?

Jane ERbacher Project RowIt all starts with your mindset. Everything. All of it.  Your thoughts create your words, your actions and your reality and your thoughts come from where? You guessed it, your mind. So how do we control our mind? And does it need controlling or does it simply require observation, acknowledgment, respect? Today I want you to think about your mind. Think about your thoughts, your words, your actions and how this impacts your reality.

Mindset may be defined as the attitude you have to yourself and to the world. The way you approach your life. Your outlook. The willingness you have to show up in every moment. The engagement you have with those around you. What is it that you require of yourself? How do you deal with ups and downs? Our thoughts and our words influence our actions, therefore our mindset is the foundation of our entire reality. What you feel, how you think, what you think and everything you say and do is your reality, therefore you are choosing what your life is with your mindset.

If you want to change your reality, it starts in your mind. It starts with what you think. It starts with how your thoughts then shape your words and it starts with how your thoughts help or hinder you to take action.

So I want you to think right now about your mindset. What is the story you are telling yourself? What language are you using to describe yourself and your life and your opportunities? This will be your greatest determinant and indicator of success in whatever you pursue.

So how do you shape your mindset or change it if it’s necessary?

Well the first thing you have to ask yourself is if you even want to. And if you want to, why do you want to? What would it mean to you? This desire has to be strong. I have no doubt you’ve spent a lot of years cementing this current mindset and it’s not easy to simply snap out of it. You need to want to change more than you want to stay the same.

Ok you’ve decided you want to change. So let’s look at your current energy and outlook. Do you complain a lot? Do you dread things? Do you grumble? Or are you grateful, generous, kind, open and honest? Have a little think about it.

Then look at the patterns and habits you have formed in your life. Are you proud of them? Do you hide them? Are you all in or all out? Do different days of the week ignite different feelings, emotions, moods? Do you wonder why you don’t lose weight but then once you pay attention realise it’s because you eat mindlessly, emotionally, disrespectfully for your body?

All your daily habits, choices and actions have led you to where you are now and all of them have determined by your mindset.

So once we’ve assessed our patterns and habits it’s time to reorient them, create a new normal, change.

The awesome things about mindset is that you can apply it to your ENTIRE LIFE. Health and body, relationships, parenting, career and anything else you can think of.

So you’re in the process of creating new habits through your mindset, how do you ensure success? What if I told you that ‘being motivated’ wasn’t the answer? How about I told you that there was a checklist you could apply to every day in order for you to maintain this mindset and not even need motivation? Well there is:

The first step to a positive mindset is what I refer to as out-flowing: Give, give thanks, show gratitude, be generous – with your energy, spirit, time and whatever else you have. But choose wisely.

The second is to get really clear on your goals AND your intentions. Write them down. What do you want for your life and why? Be specific on your goals and be more vague yet heartfelt on your intentions. Commit to your goals and live by your intentions. Every. Single. Day.

The third step is to find your internal drive. We don’t want to be dependent on external motivation to take action, rather, we want to find that passion from deep within. When something means enough to us, you can bet that you’ll take action on it. It’s habits and daily actions, paired with the intentions you have for living and the goals you continually choose that will lead you to the life you want rather than any kind of short term fitspo or inspo.

The last thing on our checklist is personal responsibility. Take responsibility for the fact that you are where you are because of the choices you have made and the action you have taken and take responsibility for the fact that it is up to you where you now go.

Yes there are external forces which enable and disenable different groups and demographics from some things in the world. I do not deny that. But for the majority of your life one of the most exciting opportunities you have is with your choices.

So what is the story you are telling yourself as to why you are not on your way to where you need to or want to be? What excises do you give yourself? How are you sabotaging your progress?

Once you realise and accept that you are always the source, this is when the world really becomes yours. Life doesn’t happen to you. You create it. It’s all up to you.

You have the opportunity to be a success in your entire life, you simply have to choose to be. It starts with your mindset. Believe in yourself, invest in yourself and continue to take the action required. It’s your life and it’s worth it.

Jane Erbacher Gym Jones

About your Author Jane Erbacher

“Find what comes naturally and work with it.”

With over 12 years’ experience in the fitness industry, Jane brings a wealth of knowledge to the RevoPT team. Beyond a long list of fitness qualifications and a degree in Arts and Health Science, Jane is currently studying law too.

A practicing health and lifestyle coach, Jane loves helping her clients grow physically and mentally. To do this, she looks at the bigger picture. Before training with Jane, she’ll look at your lifestyle, priorities and stresses to create a program that harnesses your natural strengths to get the best results.

Every session with Jane is guaranteed to be different. She’s not one for routine so expect a lot of variety and fun – whether that’s through boxing, conditioning or high intensity circuits. The only thing for certain is that you’ll walk out with a sense of achievement. Jane works with each and every client to accomplish things they thought they couldn’t do.

On top of training, Jane is responsible for compiling the individual training programs from the team and is the voice behind our our podcasts. Subscribe to our podcast and check out the latest episodes here.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • Certificate III in Fitness
  • Certificate IV in Fitness
  • Fully Certifies Gym Jones
  • Kettlebell Coaching Accreditation
  • Punchfit Level 2 Boxing Coach
  • Level 2 First Aid
  • Body Attack Instructor
  • Body Pump Instructor
  • Health & Lifestyle Coach
  • Fitness Australia Registration Level One

 If you feel like Jane is the perfect Personal Training to help you improve your mindset email us directly at hq@revopt.copm.au and we will find a time that suits you to begin training with her.

8

Feb

Get your head right to get your body right.

Psychological Influences of Optimal Performance

The influence of Psychology on Optimal Performance is still being debated through research today but there are some established theories about how these two areas are related and that an understanding of the psychological can lead to a better performance (Donaldson S., Dolwett M. & Rao. M, 2014).  There are 10 fundamental concepts which form the relationship between psychology and performance; positive view of future, sense of control, self-knowledge, activity, self-regulation, flexibility, wholeness, connection and happiness (Rottinghaus, P. 2014).  This blog aims to provide you with an understanding of some of these concepts and allow you to determine which ones contribute to your motivation and ultimately help you reach optimal performance.  

Psychology is a vital part of promoting health and well-being (Seligman M, & Csikszentmihalyi M, 2014) and is made up of many variables, however, here, we’ll focus on self-efficacy and motivation. Self-efficacy is our perceived ability to perform tasks and is essential for success in whatever we do (Bandura A, 2012).  Your 100% won’t always be the same each day.  Self-efficacy is related to our sense of control and impacts our positive view of the future and wholeness.  Low self-efficacy is commonly attributed to poor performance because we perceive a task to be hard which leads to us getting nervous or anxious due to a bad previous experience (Schwarzer R, 2014). Situational problems and individual problems we perceive are often influenced by different factors but motivation rises above the rest.  

The mindset of successSo, what motivates you to perform your job, your gym session, look after your children, your pets or even a household chore? This is what we should be focusing our attention on so that we are able to reach our desirable level of wholeness and see positively for our future, as life should be about the pursuit of happiness.

Motivation can vary depending on the task at hand or the day of the week but is split into two main categories, extrinsic & intrinsic (Reiss S, 2012). Extrinsic motivation is when you are influenced by the outcome or end result, achieving something and therefore reaching fulfilment (Reiss S, 2012).  This relates to completion of activity, feelings of wholeness, positivity and happiness which are all concepts listed above.  Intrinsic motivation is built from interest and inquisition (Reiss S, 2012) and is driven by persistence to better one’s view of the future, self-knowledge or self-value.

How do we target motivation so that individuals reach optimal performance? Research suggests that self-assessment tactics can lead to persistence, enhanced learning or engagement in new or additional activities (Boud D, 2013).  This leads us to suggest that we need to understand both what we are interested in and what we want to achieve before we can reach our optimal performance.

Situational problems and individual problems have been previously mentioned and are also important for us to distinguish.  It has been suggested that situational problems are negatively impacted by extrinsic motivational factors whereas extrinsic motivators had a positive impact on individual problems.  An example of this in the gym would be when you’re not achieving a goal.  Giving you a reward as a motivator is only over time going to be deflating if you’re unable to understand what it is limiting you in achieving your goal.  As opposed to an inquisitive approach which assesses why you’re not at your goal yet and then giving you the understanding to achieve your goal, which in turn becomes your reward!  

So, how do we summarise the influence of self-efficacy and motivation on optimal performance? What do we know? There is a relationship between self-efficacy and motivation and both of these can influence optimal performance positively and negatively.  It is important for us to understand what motivates us, what we believe we are capable of and acknowledge what we need to improve.  Some people are motivated by rewards or results, some are motivated by learning and education but neither is more beneficial it is dependent upon context (situational or personal).  

TAKE AWAY POINTS:

  1. Put a plan in place- In the gym, it’s simple, set your goals and understand what you need to do to achieve them.
  2. Talk to someone– might mean talking to a friend, another member or even one of the awesome team at RevoPT.  
  3. Be consistent and commit – Continue to work on what you do well but focus on what you don’t, improvement takes time and so does learning and achieving your long term goals.
  4. Trust the process – Be patient, understand your motivation and believe in yourself! These are all tangibles to achieving your optimal performance.

Good luck crushing your goals in 2017 and I hope this helps.