Author Archives: Luke Scott

How to sleep your way to the top

It’s one of the most overlooked parameters for health!

Sleep can literally transform your life if you can get it right consistently, whereas lack thereof can wreak havoc on your day to day operations and your physical and psychological wellbeing.

Firstly, this blog has been inspired by the book, ‘The Sleep Revolution’ by Arianna Huffington and a Google Talk by Shawn Stevenson (links below). It has opened my eyes, which is kind of an oxymoron, to the value of a good quality night’s sleep and how it can impact your life and health so positively or in fact negatively.

Arianna Huffington on The Science of Sleep and Success

I’ve been closely monitoring my quality and quantity of sleep for a few months now and using this to assess how I feel on any given day to make the link between how my sleep is impacting my emotions and potentially fuelling my eating and recovery patterns. There are also other factors that contribute to how you feel like stress, exercise levels and nutrition that play a part so I also tried reducing stress by meditating regularly, reading, eating balanced nutrition and sticking to a regular training regime over this time.

I’ve been using an App called Sleep Cycle (it’s free on the app store) to track my sleep cycle and average quantity of sleep and if this topic interests you I recommend trying it.

What I have found is that when I get a good quality sleep I can perform well in my daily activities on less quantity. However if my sleep is not of a good quality and usually lacking in quantity and I am restless I will find myself tired, lethargic, impatient and less efficient at problem solving and higher thinking.

Start by asking yourself, how important is sleep to you?

Most of us, and this included me until I become more educated on this topic, undervalue sleep. I’m unsure as to why but it might have something to do with our work environments, the pressures of having deadlines and maybe just not knowing the education around how important sleep really is to a long healthy life, free of mental health concerns and disease.

How many of you can say that you get between 7 – 9 hours of sleep a night? If you can, that’s great!

But how many of you that get enough sleep, can say that you wake up in the morning feeling fresh and ready to take on the day with your best foot forward?

Some of you may but I am guessing that the majority of people would be leaning towards the ‘NO’ side of the equation. Am I right?

Yes, quantity is important, but the quality of sleep is also a factor we really need to consider, so let’s talk about that.

Quantity vs. Quality

When we are younger we need more sleep, our cells are turning over in our bodies and brains faster and we require more physical and psychological repair. As we age this starts to slow, thus requiring less sleep.

It’s estimated that having between 7 – 9 hours of sleep is sufficient for the majority of us. The quality of that time can vary, and what does quality actually mean?

Basically ‘quality’ means the excellence in something. A quality sleep = an excellent sleep = free from waking or being woken during the night, free from middle of the night bathroom trips and general restlessness.

Now can you say that you get regular quality sleep?

If sleep is interrupted, it could be disrupting physical and or physiological repair.

The sleep cycle is broken into 5 phases, 2 of which (the Deep and REM sleep phases) are particularly needed for physical and psychological repair and regeneration. It’s interesting to note that the sleep cycle is about 90mins long so you will have at least 5 – 7 of these during one sleep night.

Now think about how interrupted, poor quality and quantity sleep night after night might be affecting your physical and mental health. It might not be the only answer to your health concerns but it might be a good place to start looking at for improving physical and mental health.

Shawn Stevenson, a best-selling author and creator of the Model Health Show explains the adverse effects of sleep deprivation being insulin resistance (which could lead to Type 2 diabetes), immune system failure, obesity and depression.

Shawn has some tips about getting a good quality night’s sleep. Some of these include:

  • Get more sunlight throughout the day which affects melatonin production
  • Avoid the screen including phones, television and such devices of technology for at least anhour before bed
  • Caffeine curfew, for most people this is around 4pm
  • Be cool and set up the temperature, if the room is too warm it will affect the sleep cycle
  • Go to bed at the right time. Humans get the most significant hormonal secretions andrecovery by sleeping during the hours of 10pm and 2am The rest of these can be found here: http://theshawnstevensonmodel.com/sleep-problems-tips/

He goes on to mention ‘a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal showed that sleep deprivation is directly related to an inability to lose weight. Test subjects were put on the same exercise and diet program, but those who were in the sleep deprivation group (less than 6 hours per night) consistently lost less weight and body fat than the control group who slept for 8+ hours a night.’

My education and information has come from a few different, easy to access sources and I would encourage you to have a look at the resources provided. I hope some of this resonates with you and you can be on your way to valuing sleep for all of its benefits. I hope this can help at least one of you have some control over a higher level of wellbeing.

I’d love to hear how many of you are intrigued by this topic and if you have any question I’d love to find the answer for you and create discussion around this.

Krystal McCluskey

More Resources:

The Key to POWERFUL Sleep for Ultimate Human Performance with Shawn Stevenson

The missing link in achieving your best.

We all set ourselves arbitrary goals this time of year. To be fitter, to be healthier, to lose a bit of weight.

I’m all for using this time of year to reset ourselves mentally. To refocus our energy and to set your sights on achieving more for yourself as you move forward.

We do it in business, in our personal lives, with our jobs and careers and I’m sure many of you, as I do, do the same with your personal relationships too. A date night once a week with your partner as a goal. To see your grandmother more often etc, etc.

When people talk about goal setting you’ll often hear about S.M.A.R.T. goals.

In short this means goals that are:

Specific

Measurable

Achievable

Realistic &

Timely or Time Bound

For me this works, and works well. Especially the timely part of things.

However, a missing link for me though is making your goals public, or essentially making yourself accountable to achieving your goals.

So, this year when you’re setting your goals for what you’re wanting to achieve for the year ahead ask yourself ‘Is competing the missing link in me reaching my goals?’.

Now I’m sure you have just said to yourself, ‘yeah right Luke, I’m wanting to run a marathon this year and now you’re wanting me to complete with the Kenyan’s…’.

Well not exactly.

What I mean is making the fact that you are going to be running the marathon public knowledge, telling everyone who will listen. Making them aware. Or at least the people that matter the most to you anyway. Especially those that you see most often.

Why? Because they’re going to help to keep you accountable to your plan. They’re going to be asking you every time they see you how your marathon training is going or how close you are to running that sub 20 minute 5k, or if you’ve nailed that 200kg deadlift.

They’re going to be checking in with you and if you are serious about your goal your not going to be wanting to let them, and more importantly yourself down.

I have used this approach personally a couple of specific times to great effect. Once, when I ran the 2012 Melbourne Marathon and more recently with my first Weightlifting competition in December.

It wasn’t a big competition by any means, but for me it was the first step in part of a larger journey. It was a small local competition in Geelong. However, I really wanted to commit to the process, train well for it, learn from all of the experiences I was to have along the way of training for something that I was a complete novice at and push myself to get better at something.

I could have easily keep it anonymous from my colleagues and family but I wanted to make sure with all of the pressures of life, family and work I committed to competition on this day and moved forward from there. It made me a lot more nervous on the day knowing that everyone would be eagerly awaiting updates when I was finished but that was all part of the journey.

A minor injury hiccup about 2 weeks out from competition could have easily derailed my plan as well had I not had my accountability network in full force. A bit of treatment and some modifications to my training plan had me back up to speed and feeling 100% for the day.

The result? Respectable I guess for where I was at as a complete novice. Something I was reasonably proud of.

The added bonus? The increased focus and dedication to my training in the lead up had me hit an all time PB only three days post competition.

Another thing competing helped me with was setting my expectations of myself in the future that little bit higher. Maybe something that was also partly responsible for that all time PB. We can all start to feel that we are tracking well. That we are reaching our potential. Spend a little time around people that are truely pushing themselves to their limits and we can quickly realise that we should be asking more of ourselves. Whether this is in life, our career or with our fitness. Five people who lift you up and push you harder and spend more time around them.

Competing can help us to connect with these like minded individuals and form bonds that can help us as we continue down the path of progress.

So as you’re setting your goals for the year ahead ask yourself if there is a way that you can turn your individual goal into something competitive. Once again, this doesn’t have to be outwardly competitive against the rest of the field in a marathon but it could mean you’re keeping yourself accountable against your previous best time in a run, a pace you’ve set for yourself or it could be more strength focused. Commit to competing in a novice weightlifting, powerlifting or strongman competition. If it’s more overall or general fitness would something like a Crossfit competition suit you, or Spartan Race or Tough Mudder.

If you’re anything like me you’ll find the pressure of impending competition will sharpen your training focus, help you remove any of the obstacles that seem to always otherwise find themselves in your way in normal circumstances and help you to really bring the best out of yourself.

So for me, 2018 holds many more opportunities to compete. I’m currently setting up my calendar to be jam packed, but also as realistic as possible so that my training can be taken seriously.

After all I want to make sure I take every opportunity I can to get myself back into this ridiculous looking onsie…

[Case Study] – Why I choose RevoPT – Hanna W

“I find that the early morning classes are a great way to start the day.”

If you’re like Hanna and want to kick things off with us here at Revolution Personal Training we’d love to help you to work towards the healthiest version of yourself.

Don’t wait until the new year to kick of your healthier lifestyle.

Start today!

We are open right throughout the festive season and would love to see you down here. 

Are you keen to give training in one of our small Group Training classes a go?

Head along to one of our classes for free to see if what we offer is for you.

You can register for a free class here.

You can view our full class timetable and chose a class that suites you best here.

Or download our App to book classes on the go here:

iPhone or Android.

Just want to jump right into things? You can purchase your two week Unlimited Group Training trial by clicking the link below.

Why I chose RevoPT – Jayne S

“The way the class timetable has been set up enables me to really get the most out of my training and combine strength and cardio training and really get the most out of my time.”

Jayne is a hard working busy mum and we’re glad that we can provide a solution that help her to keep progressing in the right direction with her training.

Are you keen to give training in one of our small Group Training classes a go?

Head along to one of our classes for free to see if what we offer is for you.

You can register for a free class here.

You can view our full class timetable and chose a class that suites you best here.

Or download our App to book classes on the go here:

iPhone or Android.

Just want to jump right into things? You can purchase your two week Unlimited Group Training trial by clicking the link below.

So you wanna be an Ironman?

What the hell even is an Ironman? Well I’m here to give you a little insight into what is is and how my little project is coming along!

The definition;

Iron Man

noun

  • (Especially is a sporting context) an exceptionally strong or robust man
  • A multi event sporting contest demanding stamina in particular a triathlon involving swimming, cycling and running.

Cheers Google, fairly accurate.

However in my quest to become an Ironman, through conversations with my non-triathlon affiliated friends/family/clients I’ve been called far from the above, more close to the following:

  • Addicted
  • Crazy
  • Insane
  • Inspiring
  • Committed

I’ve been looked up and down with a strange look on people’s face, as if to say – You?! How?!

I’ve had people say that I don’t have a typical triathletes body type.

I’ve been told that they are extremely expensive.

Mostly commonly I get asked why? Why would you want do that?!

These comments and questions are also somewhat accurate.

So here is what I believe Ironman is all about…

The breakdown of the day, 3.8km swim, 180km bike & 42.2km run. Easy as that right? Well I’d like to say yes, but I truly believe that the day will be the easier part, its the months of training, recovering, eating, sleeping and working to pay for the event that has been the hard part.

The decision to undertake my first Ironman was decided well over a year before the actual race date. It was never a dream of mine as a kid to do one, in fact I never had interest at all to do one when I started in triathlon nearly 3 years ago. I had no desire what so ever to do one.

Until…. Well I guess I was surrounded by more and more people who were training for them. I had been on various training camps where people had shared their Ironman story with me. My coaches often referred to them, it just seemed to be around me more and more. The more I heard about them the more I became fascinated with them. The distances for each discipline, the preparation that is required, the dedication, I wanted to know more. I read many blogs about pros and age groupers completing them, some good, some not so good. Every time I read more, heard more, a part of me wanted to experience this. I wanted to call myself an Ironman.

It wasn’t until around this time last year, when many of the athletes I train alongside were weeks away from toeing the line to complete their first Ironman when I made a commitment to myself that it would be me their the following year. I was going to do Ironman Western Australia. This made my body tingle! I couldn’t believe I was going to be doing this.

From that moment it has basically never left my mind, I think about it every day.

‘If you can’t stop thinking about it, don’t stop working for it’ And thats what I did.

I knew I needed a tribe of people to work with me to help me get prepared.

In my mind I made a list of important people who I needed on board to allow this to happen.

So first stop was my darling boyfriend, Scott. We were out for dinner and I was like a nervous school girl. He was on his phone when I said I had something to ask, his face instantly looked worried. I told him I wanted to do an Ironman. With a relieved look, he responded ‘Your going to be so tired’, followed by if thats what you want to do, go for it’.

His support means the world to me, knowing he will be at the finish line makes me so happy.

Next up was my boss Luke Scott. Training for Ironman while working full time doesn’t allow for much else. I needed to no I had his support, that he understood what I was committing to. Of course he was fully on board and has shown great interest throughout the whole process. Again knowing Luke and his family are travelling over to watch gives me motivation to keep pushing throughout each week.

Last but not least was my amazing coach, Sarah. I was super excited to tell her my new goal but also part of me was nervous to know what her reaction was going to be. Of all people, Sarah was going to know if I was capable of doing this. She was so supportive with the whole thing. Very real and honest. Something I believe needs to happen between us when preparing for an event like this.

With my tribe on board, I was good to go. From that point in time, everything I was doing was building into Ironman. Over the weeks my training has slowly started to increase across all disciplines. Three weeks of slowly building up then an adaptation week which is a week with decreased volume. It still amazes me how the human body adapts to progressive training. As a PT I see this all the time but training for Ironman has amplified this. Long rides starting at around 2-3 hours on the weekend, to now 5+ hours with a run and swim and the body just copes!

Some days are definitely harder than others. There are days I just want to go home and sleep for hours. But time is just so crucial.  As part of my build I raced a half Ironman up at the Sunshine Coast, the race was pretty awful, it wasn’t a reflection of the hard work I had put in. It still gives me shivers thinking about it. But after experiencing such a crappy race it has fuelled many of my sessions where I have felt like skipping them.

I am not sitting at around to 4.5 weeks out and I’m right in the middle of my final build, also known as Peak Week. Over the next 2 weeks I will complete the most amount of training I have ever done in my life. Im I am loving every minute of it! I am so thrilled with how my training is going. My goals throughout Iroman was to keep my body injury free. This is the biggest commitment I’ve ever done and I wanted to give myself the best possible chance. I truly believe the 1 percenters outside of the swim, bike, run training have been what has helped keep my body ticking over. Sleep, my number one priority to ensure I recover well. This can be a tricky one at times, but majority of the time is pretty good. Mobility pre and post sessions to help prepare my body for long sessions. Regular massage to eliminate and tightness that occurs from the repetitive motions. Acupuncture and yoga to balance my body out and help keep my hormones happy. (Game changer for me).

I believe strength training has truly helped keep my body together. I have come from a strength training background so always found I have been relative strong, whereas endurance does not come easy for me, I’ve had to work hard and be consistent. It’s the regular heavy strength training while being consistent with Ironman training that is what has helped me get this far injury free. I feel like over the years of building my endurance base while keeping up with my strength training is what has kept me robust. I definitely have experienced niggles here and there, but identifying them early and keeping on top of them has been crucial. Last but not least, good nutrition. Knowing what will fuel me pre and post sessions to allow me to keep trucking along. I’ve become aware of the foods I perform well off and those that don’t. I feel the fittest and strongest I’ve ever been!

Weeks ago when people asked me how I was going with my training and if I felt ready, I would always answer with uncertainty. I mean, it just felt like it was so far away. Now after some big weeks of training, I can really visualise it now. All those long sessions and 1 percenters are starting to come together.

Like I said earlier, I think it is so amazing how your body can adapt.

So when people call me crazy, addicted, insane, committed, inspiring I agree! I believe if you want to get through the process of an Ironman you require these attributes. The process has required me to make many, many sacrifices, some easy, some not so easy. There are times I feel so proud of what I’m doing but lately have felt selfish as my training is my priority at the moment, friends and family have been put to the side at times and this can be really hard. But knowing I have a bunch of amazing people supporting me through this journey has made those tough moments that little bit easier. I believe until your surround around by it, it can be hard for people to understand the time and effort that goes into the preparation. But I know that when I get to cross that finish line it will all be worth every one of those highs and low moments. The whole experience has been awesome.

So yes, I… Jaimie Lee Brown, JLB, the Bumble Bee will be an Ironman!

I cannot wait to share with you my race report, stay tuned!