22

Feb

More Power!

Would you like to be more powerful? Athletically speaking?

Increasing your power will allow you to generate force at a faster rate (rate of force development) and move faster.  This is not just important for elite athletes but the everyday weekend sporting warrior and also the elderly population (imaging being able to react quicker and prevent a fall that could cause serious injury).

Hence it is important to train in the correct manner for power to improve this athletic quality. 

Lets look at one of the equations for power; POWER = FORCE x VELOCITY

To keep things simple, to get more powerful whilst training it is important to generate a lot of FORCE i.e. lift a heavy weight, and move it quickly and explosively (high VELOCITY).

Of course the trick here is that when something gets heavier you cannot lift it as fast, so how heavy should you lift and how fast should you lift it?  Well you should always try to lift as fast as possible (while maintaining good technique) when trying to maximize power development.  But ‘HOW’ heavy is something that is more difficult to determine.  This will be different for each individual based on training experience, strength levels and genetics.  To determine the optimal load for maximizing power in various exercises sport science testing equipment is available to accurately provide you with this information.  Unfortunately this equipment is not available to many outside elite sporting environments.  So lets focus on several methods of training that have been proven to improve your muscular power.

Method 1

Strength Training

Just get stronger!  Strength is the base for all things powerful.  Improving your strength by performing resistance training will in most instances improve your power, especially if you have a limited training history or are relatively weak and have a greater window for adaptation and improvement.

Method 2

Plyometric training

Plyometric training sees the body or training equipment being propelled into space hence the speed of movement (velocity) will always be higher that traditional resistance training. This method of training enhances your rate of force development, particularly when requiring to move your own body weight rapidly.  Exercises such as jump squats, broad jumps, single leg hops and clap push-ups are all forms of plyometric exercises.  Low repetition numbers and long rest periods are needed for plyometric exercises to ensure the body has adequate recovery and perform at the optimal level reducing the likely hood of injury.

Method 3

Weightlifting or Olympic Lifting

The sport of Weightlifting sees athletes perform two classical lifts, the snatch and the clean and jerk.  Weightlifters are amongst some of the most powerful athletes in the world.  After all their sport involves them lifting as heavy as weight as possible from the floor to above their head.  To do this a high amount of force needs to be created at rapid velocities (with extreme technical skill).  Research studies have shown that weightlifting training alone improved vertical jump to a greater extent than plyometric and traditional resistance training.

In conclusion the best methods for improving power all involve one constant.  You are trying to move fast and explosively.  Remember that strength is the base for all thins powerful, so you need to continually improve your strength levels through heavy resistance training.  But to get quick you have to move quick, power does equal force multiplied by velocity!  Remember that movement patterns must be well practiced before high weights are moved quickly. 

Nearly all classes at Revolution develop your strength and power in some form. However the Pure Strength and Strongman classes specifically have this focus.  Ask any of the trainers here at Revolution if you want to understand the importance of and methods of developing your POWER, athletically speaking of course.

References

The Effect of Different Training Programs on Eccentric Energy Utilization in College-Aged Males. Hawkins, S B; Doyle, T L A; McGuigan,  R. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, October 2009, Vol. 23 – Issue 7: pp 1996-2002

Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. 4th Edition. Editors G Haff & N Travis Triplett.  National Strength and Conditioning Association

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