Author Archives: Luke Scott

Welcome to the team: Jamie Crawford

South Melbourne Personal Trainer Jamie Crawform

Personal Trainer Jamie Crawford

Revolution Personal Training is delighted to welcome Jamie Crawford to our ever growing team of Elite Personal Trainers.

Jamie comes to us with a wealth of knowledge and experience including competing at an elite level herself in boxing as well as tackling a number of debilitating injuries giving her a unique approach to performance problem solving and strength and conditioning.

Jamie will be available for one on one personal training sessions in the evenings here at #RevoPT as well as running a number of our Group Personal Training classes at night.

If you would like to read more about Jamie you can visit her personal trainer profile on our website here: http://revo.pt/jamiecrawford

Or to book an appointment with Jamie email us on hq@revopt.com.au ✊

What role can soft tissue massage play in recovery?

BodyTune MassageOn the back of our first workshop for 2015, Body Tune wants to remind you of the role of soft tissue massage in muscle recovery.

If you are a revolution regular who enjoys a few classes per week, this hard training can cause an elevation in muscle tone during increased volume and/or intensity of training.

 

 

 

 

An increase in muscle tone may:

  • Impair delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the cells
  • Slow the removal of metabolites
  • Cause biomechanical abnormalities if asymmetrical
  • Limit shock absorbency predisposing to muscle strain
  • Cause fatigue affecting proprioception and can trigger pain
  • Cause irritation to previous soft tissue lesions
  • Create bulky connective tissue affecting flexibility and function
  • Make fasical tissue less pliable
  • Develop trigger points affecting strength, can progress to injury

Role of soft tissue massage in recovery:

  • Contributes to soft tissue recovery
  • Reduces post-exercise muscle tone
  • Increases ROM
  • Increases circulation and nutrition to cells
  • Deactivate trigger points
  • Improve function
  • Help identify soft tissue abnormalities that could progress to injury
  • A psychological affect

A combination of active recovery and soft tissue massage has been shown to be more effective than single interventions alone in maintaining performance.

Get a BODY TUNE MASSAGE !

Book yourself an appointment with our experienced Body Tune therapists or come say ‘Hi’ after one of your sessions for an assessment and treatment and discuss how we can help you improve your “recovery” status.

Visit our website at www.bodytunehm.com.au for more information and BOOK ONLINE!

Email: info@bodytunehm.com.au

Siubhan’s Choc Avocado Mousse

Siubhan's Choc Avocado MousseSiubhan’s Choc Avocado Mousse is an awesome healthy chocolaty treat.

Have a crack and putting this one together and we’re pretty sure you’ll be a convert to this as an alternative to your standard recipe!

 

 

Ingredients:

2 large ripe avocados

1/4 cup raw cacao powder

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey

1/3 cup coconut cream

150g dark (70%) chocolate, melted

Extra grated dark chocolate to serve (optional)

Step One:

Cut the avocados, remove stone and skin. Scoop flesh into the large bowl of a food processor. Add the cacao powder, vanilla, maple syrup and coconut cream. Process for 10 seconds the scrape down the sides of bowl and process for another 10 seconds.

Step Two:

Add the cooled, melted dark chocolate. Process for another 10-15 seconds or until creamy and smooth. Spoon into a ‘small’ 🙂 serving bowl or glasses.

Serve with fresh fruit and enjoy! Let us know what you think of this one.

Building Strength to Enhance Endurance Go the Distance With Resistance

Whether it is used to maximise sporting prowess or to stay fit and active, endurance training is an excellent fitness option. However, it can also be damaging on our joints and various soft tissues including tendons, ligaments and muscles. For endurance athletes, those who compete in ultra long distance events with a view to pushing their physical capabilities to the limit, the risks are further magnified. From soft and connective tissue injuries such as muscle tears and ruptured tendons respectively, the repetitive strain placed on joints, and the massive, and prolonged impact our bones must endure, endurance sports do pose a risk and most endurance athletes will sustain an injury (or injuries) at some point in their career. From patellofemoral pain syndrome to Achilles tendinopathy to medial tibial stress syndrome, iliotibial band friction syndrome, plantar fasciitis and lower extremity stress fractures, the various overuse injuries often encountered by endurance athletes can stifle, or even end one’s competitive aspirations for good.

Restance Training to Increase Endurance Performance

Photo: Breaking Muscle

To offset the likelihood of injury, many endurance folk are turning to resistance training. Strength training can be employed to improve our performance for endurance events. Through balanced weight training we may correct structural imbalances which may encourage improper motor patterns. If, for example, one side of your body is weaker than the other, your stride will adversely be affected. By strengthening your weaker side you may, on the other hand, become a faster and more efficient runner. Strength training can also reduce chronic pain and joint discomfort.

Though an established training modality for most endurance athletes, resistance methods often take a backseat to more endurance-specific training protocols. Big mistake. By incorporating additional resistance work and, for some, reducing our endurance output we may recover better and become stronger and less susceptible to injury. Let’s explore some of the additional ways resistance training may build better, more resilient endurance athletes.

Increased bone density

Stronger bones can absorb a greater impact without becoming damaged. And nothing builds stronger bones than hard, heavy resistance training. Many long distance runners encounter medial tibial stress syndrome (commonly known as shin splints), a painful condition which may severely curtail our training efforts. By strengthening the tibia bone with anterior tibialis and calf raises, for example, we may lessen the impact cumulative stress places on this region. Aside from strengthening muscle tissue to enable a greater anaerobic output when pulling ahead of the competition, weight training, in particular that involving heavy (80% or more of our one repetition maximum) compound lifts such as the squat, deadlift and bench press, also promotes the increased calcification of our bones, making them both larger and stronger. As well, strength training will also increase protein synthesis of the tissues that connect bone to muscle (tendons) and bone to bone (ligaments), thus enabling them to provide greater support.

Greater joint stability

Resistance training is without equal for building bone density and strengthening the muscles that control our joints. Joint instability often arises due to an imbalance between the various muscles that act on our joints, or a general weakening of the surrounding musculature. For example, strong front quads and weak hamstrings may, over time, promote excessive straining of the connective tissues which stabilise the knees. This may lead to injury. Because endurance athletes place tremendous repetitive stress on their knees, in particular, it is essential that they train all of their leg muscles, including related muscles such as the hip flexors and commonly neglected areas such as the tibialis anterior, with equal intensity. By developing strength and size throughout our physique so as to offset muscular imbalances we create greater joint stability. Rather than receiving undue punishment, our joints, when protected by muscle, become more resilient and better functioning.

The strength to endure

By easing off the endurance and including more resistance (ensuring that optimal recovery from both is achieved), we may become better athletes, and less susceptible to injury. As well as assisting injury prevention, resistance training can also increase muscular endurance, improve speed and boost agility and overall athletic performance. So to cultivate the strength to endure, you may want to incorporate harder, heavier strength training into your current programme.

This post was written by David Robson in conjunction with Gym and Fitness Australia. David also doubles as a trainer, health and fitness educator and mentor to both established elite athletes and novice trainees alike. He has written professionally for Muscle & Fitness magazine, FLEX, bodybuilding.com, New Zealand Fitness, Inside Fitness, ALLMAX Nutrition, and Status Fitness magazine.

Siubhan’s Super Green Smoothie Recipe

Green Smoothie Recipe

Ingredients

1 BananaSuper Green Smoothie

1/4 Avocado

1/2 tsp Cinnamon

1/2 Mango

2 tbsp Maca Powder 

1 tsp Organic/Raw Honey

1 handful of Spinach

Ice

Method

Blend all ingredients together including ice in a good quality blender, blend until you get your desired texture. Recipe can be adjusted to taste. I find this smoothie is perfect for those who like a little bit of sweetness rather that just the bitter and earthy taste of a strict green smoothie. I have it in the morning either pre or post work out depending on the time. Why wouldn’t you give it a go  when it’s full of all of that goodness!

Nutritional Information

*Cinnamon is a thermogenic fat burner that will help kick start you metabolism for the day and also adds a great flavour to the smoothie. 

*Maca is widely eaten in Peru as a root vegetable and marketed elsewhere in the world as a supplement for increasing energy, stamina, strength and libido. Maca root contains calcium, iron, magnesium and selenium as well as essential fatty acids and 19 amino acids, it has a slight butter scotch smell and is quite a pleasant addition to a smoothie. And why wouldn’t you have it when it’s full of all that goodness!

*Bananas are a great form of carbohydrate and have a low Glycaemic index. The banana is the best fruit source of vitamin B6 (one small banana provides around a quarter of your daily needs; one big banana provides nearly half of your daily needs). The banana is also a wonderful source of vitamin C, along with modest amounts of the B group vitamins folate, niacin, riboflavin and pantothenic acid.
*Avocado has sometimes received a “bad rap” as a vegetable too high in fat. While it is true that avocado is a high-fat food (about 85% of its calories come from fat), the fat contained in avocado is unusual and provides research-based health benefits. Like other high-fat plant foods (for example, walnuts and flaxseeds), avocado can provide us with unique health benefits precisely because of its unusual fat composition.

*Organic/Raw Honey has so many health benefits not only is it delicious but it helps maintain our insulin levels, regulated our blood sugar levels, keeps our

skin looking beautiful and is an excellent source of energy.

*Spinach has an extremely high nutritional value and is rich in antioxidants. It is a good source of vitamins A, B2, C and K, and also contains magnesium, manganese, folate, iron, calcium and potassium. 

*Mangoes have genourous amounts of vitamin A and C plus 25 different kinds of caratenoids keep your immune system healthy and strong. It can also lower your cholesterol with its high levels of fibre, pectin and vitamin C it helps lower serum cholesterol levels. Research also suggests that the antioxidant compounds in mango have been found to protect against colon, breast, leukaemia and prostate cancers.

Why you should incorporate yoga with YOGAMIGOS into your weekly training schedule

Yoga offers health and wellness benefits for everyone. It is becoming increasingly popular amongst athletes and sports enthusiasts. Yoga can be used in conjunction with other exercise and training routines to enhance performance through; improving flexibility, speeding up recovery and promoting core strength and mental discipline. It is also a fantastic way to enhance well being and build team spirit. Any athlete can benefit from adding yoga to their training regime.

The TOP FIVE yoga poses for athletes to help improve performance.

1.) Wheel Pose (Urdhva Dhanurasana): Wheel Pose (Urdhva Dhanurasana)

very energizing, strengthens the arms whilst opening the back, shoulders, and hips

 

 

 
image22.) Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana):

calms the brain and helps
relieve stress, energizes the body, stretches the shoulders, hamstrings and calves whilst strengthening the arms and legs

 

 

image33.) Pigeon Pose (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana):

excellent for opening the hips, stretching the gluteus and developing a focused mind

 

image44) Frog Pose (Mandukasana):

Stretches the inner thighs, groins, and hips, opens the chest and shoulders and relieves stress and anxiety

 

image55.) Revolved Triangle Pose (Parivrtta Trikonasana):

Strengthens and stretches the legs, stretches the hips and spine, opens the chest to improve breathing, relieves mild back pain, stimulates the abdominal organs and improves sense of balance

 

 

YOGAMIGOSPrint run weekly sessions at Revolution Personal Training every Thursday night from 8-9pm.  Our sessions are specifically designed to assist with improving recovery whilst building strength and flexibility. These classes will improve your performance, reduce the chance of injury and leaving you feeling restored and fantastic.

We look forward to seeing you on the mat soon! Kate and Gem