Author Archives: Luke Scott

Do it.

Today I wanted to focus on this as a topic.

It’s been constantly popping up for me since my post last Monday.

As I am writing this I am listening to today’s episode of our podcast and once again it’s popping up (you can catch it here if you don’t subscribe).

So what it is? When it all boils down to it there is only one choice at the end of the day if you want to achieve anything.

 There is no I’ll start again Monday. There is no I’ll get to that eventually.

 There is point when you need to just do it.

 When is that point going to be for you?

 Make it today.

The 5 reasons why you’re not reaching your fitness goals… and what to do about it!

We get it. You’re training hard. You’re putting in the time in the gym. You’re sweating it out. But for some reason you’re just not getting the results you want.

What is it?

Is it your metabolism? Your thyroid? That doughnut you had for lunch? Or maybe you have just got big bones?

The chances are realistically it’s not actually any of the above.

I have worked in the health and fitness industry for more than 15 years now and in that time, I have worked with pretty much everyone. From athletes to new mums, to men wanting to shed weight and women wanting to tone up. You name it, I’ve seen it.

The reality is that we have more control over our bodies and our progress  than we give ourselves credit for and most of us simply need a little push in the right direction. Taking help and using the power we have to be healthier will create less frustration for you and  more importantly see you achieve lasting and sustainable results.

I might mention here, that in some instances a genuine medical intervention is required when a dysfunction occurs, but unless that has been determined, it is important to remember that we do have the opportunity to be our healthiest and fittest every day for the rest of our lives and here is how:

  1. You’re just not doing enough

So you get to the gym once or twice a week. That’s enough right? What does the rest of your time look like? Sedentary? Bed to car, car to desk, desk to car, car to couch, couch to bed?

If you want to experience genuine change you are really going to need to up the work ethic. Making exercise only a habit once or twice a week simply isn’t enough. Ensure that you are getting in a solid focused exercise session at least three times a week for 45 mins per session to start to genuinely see your body start to adapt. Similarly get moving incidentally! Make movement a habit not an exception.

  1. You’re fluffing your way through your sessions and not working hard enough

Are you more interested in scrolling your Instagram feed when you’re training than actually focusing on the work at hand? You want to create results. That requires focused attention, both mind and body. Leave the phone in your bag or better yet, work with a trainer or in a class environment so that you are 100% focused on the task at hand, not the latest cat meme or how you’re looking in the gym mirrors.

  1. You’re inconsistent

Did you have a ripper training week last week? What about the one before that? And the one before that? Consistency in your approach to training is one of the biggest factors along with intensity that is going to illicit change.

It is not enough to have focus for one week here and one week there. You need to have a consistent focused approach ongoing if you’re really wanting to get great results and feel better for the rest of your life!

Think about those people that you know that have always just been fit… Do you think it’s a little bit of magic that they were born that way? Or do you think it could have something to do with the fact that they always seem to be consistently prioritizing their health and fitness?

Consistently creating and committing to healthy habits are what is going to have you living your best.

  1. You’re eating too much. Full stop.

We look at foods as both type and quantity. Too much is too much. Excess is excess. And junk food is called junk food for a reason.

But I only had a muffin for brekkie… Really? Maybe you’re not eating copious amounts of food but you’re definitely eating too many calories. Specifically the wrong ones.

As Australians we typically eat far too many simple carbohydrates for our activity levels. Higher calorie foods or more simply processed carbohydrates do have their place in our diets at specific times… Well most things at least, definitely not Froot Loops, but generally focusing on eating more whole and real food in smaller portions sizes will help.

You may have heard the old shop on the outside aisles of the supermarket line? It does work. That doesn’t mean you should be eating nothing but toilet paper, but it does mean you should spend most of your time, energy and dollars on real foods like vegetables fruit and lean protein rather than things that are packaged.

  1. I needed a rest day.

A rest day here and a missed session there can add up.

I’m all for programmed rest and recovery, but make sure you’re sticking to your schedule. Failing to plan is planning to fail. But failing to stick to the plan can be just as bad.

If your body isn’t up to it one day that’s fine. Acknowledge it and regroup. But don’t let the day become a pattern and get into the cycle of: “I’ll start again Monday…”

For many people Monday never comes.

For some people there might be more than these 5 things holding them back. But for many getting these basics right will have a huge benefit.

Keep it simple. Keep it focused and you will get your body to where you want it to be.

As always. If you’d like some help reach out. It’s why we do what we do.

Want to know a little bit more about us?

Check out the video below.

– Luke

Give training with us a go!

How do you know unless you know?

How do you know you’re making progress? How do you know you’re headed in the right direction? How do you know you’re on track?

Your phone starts ringing. It’s an emergency phone call.

You have to be in Sydney by midnight. Tonight!

You have to drive as you’re taking an emergency delivery to a family member.

Can you make it happen?

Of course you can… With time to spare!

You know your destination. You know your timeframe. You know the way (or at least you know that google maps does). You’ll make it there by dinner time…

So why should any other demanding task or achievement in your life be any different?

You can and should approach your fitness journey in the exact same way.

First, what is your goal?

Now this is an important point. What is your goal. Not what is your end point, but what is your next marker?

You’re not going to drive to Sydney and suddenly decide you’re going to stay after you make your delivery. Think of your fitness journey in the same way.

If you’re goal is to lose 5 kilos or increase your squat to 150kgs know that this isn’t a full stop. Otherwise your hard work will be undone pretty easily. Know that once you reach that goal, or preferably before you reach your goal you need to set the next marker that you need to achieve otherwise progress can stall pretty quickly. We all know the stories of people who have dropped the weight or ran the marathon to only bottom out pretty quickly afterwards.

Give you self a chance to enjoy the spoils of each little victory but refocus quickly. After all before you leave on the trip to Sydney you know that you’ve gotta get your arse back to Melbourne at some point don’t you? Or at lease you’d better. You can only tolerate Sydney coffee for a maximum two days running.

Know that your goal posts can be fluid as well. Swinging by Newcastle for a night shouldn’t be out of the question right?

If your goal is to lose 5 kilos and part of the way there you feel like it is not enough, raise the bar. Alternatively if you find that as the 5 kilos of body fat is starting to melt off you feel like you’re becoming too lean and feel like you need to increase your muscle mass start to shift your focus.

The import thing is that you have markers to measure your performance.

On your drive to Sydney you have a heap of distinct and very measurable markers:How far have you come?How far have you got to go?How much fuel have you got?How much will you need?How fast are you travelling?Is it fast enough for you to meet your objective?Is it too fast and you’re risking getting a ticket?

The point is that it is very easy for you to take a glance and your cars dashboard and the clock and know exactly where everything sits.

Any fitness goal (or life goal for that matter) should be the same.

Break down the big picture into manageable chunks. Know what you need to achieve along the way and by when. Know how much time and energy and work it is going to take. Decide if the work is worth it for you. Do you really want it?

If you don’t know how to formulate this sort of plan get the advice of someone that can help. Find someone that can break down each of the steps for you. Someone that can set the timeframe and workout the markers for you and guide you every step of the way.

Then, when you’re ready to go, get behind the wheel and drive that sucker hard. After all no one else can drive your life but you!

If you need a hand, reach out. I’m happy to help and there’s nothing more I love than seeing people achieve great things. 🙂

– Luke

Staying hydrated is as easy as 1L, 2L, 3L…

Sometimes it’s hard enough remembering to consume enough water on a daily basis but particularly coming into the cooler months of the year, it can be difficult to hydrate our bodies and maintain a good water balance to assist us with recovery and physical performance.

Water is vital to health, healing and life. The human brain is made up of approximately 95% water, with the lungs at nearly 90%. As is evident, not only is water abundant in the body but it is also the single most important nutrient your body needs to function.

According to Don Tolman, the Indiana Jones of Wholefood Medicine, an individual needs to consume around 1 litre of water for every 22kg of body weight. For someone of 70kg, this is around 3L of water that should be consumed daily.

In a previous blog posting ‘Optimising your recovery from training’ we discussed that a common recommendation for adults is to drink 2.1-2.6 litres (8-10 cups) daily, but most experts agree it’s not possible to specify a quantity that is suitable for everyone.

There are many factors at play when it comes to determining your water requirements; these include genetic, body size, fitness levels, environment and exercise.

You will lose body water content through regular daily processes including breathing, sweating, bowel and urine movements and this can total a fluid loss of 4% total body weight so replacement of this as a minimum is essential.

Exercise performance is impaired when an individual is dehydrated by as little as 2% of body weight. It can reduce an individual’s ability to thermo regulate and tolerate heat, which is a very important mechanism when it comes to engagement in physical activity. Dehydration can also contribute to the early onset of fatigue in prolonged exercise.

Dehydration occurs when we are not replacing our fluid losses throughout the day.

There are some common signs and symptoms when we experience dehydration. See if you can relate to any of these.

Signs of dehydration

  • dry mouth
  • decreased sweat rate
  • dry skin
  • yellowing of the eyes
  • chapped lips

Symptoms

  • headaches
  • sleep disturbances
  • reduction in blood volume
  • constipation
  • increased core temperature
  • extended recovery time
  • lowered immune function
  • decreased reaction time
  • decreased cognitive function

Water should be the go to fluid for the majority of the day in regards to hydration, however when we perform exercise we sweat more and lose electrolytes that can only be replaced by food or electrolyte drinks such as hydralite, shotz and gastrolyte. These should be used in conjunction with water and alongside medical advice.

The general advice around fluid consumption after exercises is for every 1kg loss through sweat and exercise, a replacement of 1.5L is required.

Understandably it can be hard to prioritise hydration on a daily basis given the busy nature of our working lives but it is something that I personally and professionally recommend drawing focus to for increased performance, injury prevention and overall wellbeing.

If drinking water for you is difficult, you can add natural flavour by adding fruits, vegetables and herbs such as lemon, strawberries, cucumber, orange, mint and raspberries. You can also consume your water warm/hot infused with the above food products. These will give you the added immune benefits and help you remain cold and flu free throughout winter.

Make sure you always have a bottle with you so it can act as a reminder to maintain daily water requirements.

Written by Krystal McCluskey

http://www.ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/fact_sheets/fluid_-_who_needs_it

http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/dehydration-and-its-effects-on-performance

https://www.acefitness.org/blog/5397/how-hydration-affects-performance

http://thedontolman.com/blog/tag/water/

The top 5 point for optimising your recovery from training.

You’ve started strong and are crushing your training but. How should you recover from exercise?

Have you ever woken up feeling really sore from your previous training session? Or maybe you have been sore for a whole week? We are going to look at some of the reasons why your body might not be recovering as well as it should and then look at ways to improve this.  Before we look at improving your recovery rate we need to understand why you are getting sore in the first place.

Why am I sore after a workout?

The technical term for post soreness is referred to as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), this soreness will often affect your ability to backup intense exercise sessions. This is often felt a day or two after a heavy bout of exercise. Simply put, DOMS occurs when you work your muscles harder than what they are used too. However that doesn’t mean that if you don’t pull up sore the next day that it has not been a good session, it’s all about the quality of a workout and the intention.

Research is inconclusive as to the exact mechanism of why DOMS occurs, however most studies show it appears to be the product of inflammation caused by microscopic tears in the connective tissue. So is this good or bad? In short, feeling sore and increasing muscle mass don’t necessarily go hand in hand. A little muscle damage is good and necessary for growth; however when DOMS causes a decrease in force production or negatively affects your motivation to work out, the disadvantages outweigh the benefits.

Effective recovery modalities can prevent DOMS from negatively affecting your training. There are a number of factors, including sleep, hydration, nutrition and sleep which affect your rate of recovery. So let’s look into these factors in further detail:

  1. What happens while I sleep?

Sleep normalises hormone levels required for recovery, with growth hormone and the sex hormones optimised – aiding in muscle repair. So rest is critical to the recovery process because while you’re resting, your body is building muscle. Sleep also plays a role in ‘resetting’ insulin resistance, aids the immune system and reduces inflammation. Without enough quality sleep, your body cannot fully recover from exercise and you will not allow your body to adapt to training (i.e reduce performance).

Should I train or rest?

High intensity training and lack of sleep skyrocket your cortisol levels, leading to overtraining and possible adrenal fatigue. In order words you cannot burn the candle at both ends – training hard and lack of sleep will not end well. So if you’re already sleep deprived and struggling to know whether to trade sleep for exercise, prioritise sleep and aim for just three workouts each week. Once you’re on a regular sleep schedule, you can increase the number and intensity of your workouts.

How much sleep do I need?

Everyone needs a different amount of sleep, so it’s important to get to know your body and figure out how much works for you.There are plenty of free apps which can help you track the length and quality of your sleep to get a better understanding of how much you really need. One that I like to use is sleep cycle. Tracking your sleep will help set a good routine of going to bed and waking up at a similar time each day. With enough sleep, you can be more productive, feel better all day long and put more intensity into your workouts.

  1. What and when should I be eating?

Ensure you are having a meal or snack within 30 mins post session that has a combination of protein and carbohydrates. The protein will assist with rebuilding the muscle and the carbohydrate component will replace glycogen levels stored in the muscle. Recovery snacks include, protein shakes, fruit and nuts, hard boiled eggs etc.

If you’re training in the morning… have a small snack 30 mins prior e.g fruit, museli bar, protein shake. If you are working out on an empty stomach you will not have any ‘fuel’ in the tank to push yourself hard.

If you’re training in the evening… ensure your nutrition is balanced throughout the day by eating a meal or snack every 3-4 hours that contains a combination of carbohydrates, fat and protein.

  1.  Should I exercise while I’m stressed?

Exercising after work can be a great way to unwind, however if it’s been a particularly stressful day your brain will be tired which will lead to physical fatigue, thus compromising your workout!  Exercising after the occasional harrowing day is unavoidable, but if you are chronically stressed, you could be affecting your fitness goals. A new study in the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology found that mental burnout significantly affected physical performance.  Another problem with exercising under stress is increasing your risk of injury. Research has shown that a high degree of major life stresses (moving, divorce, death of a family member, etc.) or a high amount of daily hassles (getting a flat tire or a speeding ticket etc.) can increase your risk for exercise injury. This is thought to result from attentional deficits and increased muscle tension.

  1.      How much water should I be drinking?

Water is the most vital component of your body and every single cell depends on it. We need water to help eliminate wastes and toxins, carry nutrients and oxygen to cells, help act as a cushion for your nervous system, keep joints lubricated, regulate our body temperature and, most importantly, keep body cells hydrated. Dehydration is a major predictor of fatigue during sustained high intensity exercise. Inadequate water intake results in thermal stress, low plasma volume, premature fatigue and other major markers of impaired recovery.

So how much should you be drinking to keep hydrated?

A common recommendation for adults is to drink 2.1-2.6 litres (8-10 cups) daily, but most experts agree it’s not possible to specify a quantity that is suitable for everyone.

Why? How much water you need depends on how quickly you are losing it from your body, and this is influenced by many factors including your health status, climate, how active you are, your age and what food and beverages you consume.

In normal environmental conditions, the turnover of water (via breathing, sweating, bowel and urine movements) in most adults is approximately 4 per cent of total body weight. This is equivalent to 2.5 — 3 litres a day in a 70kg adult. The food we consume contributes approximately 20 per cent (about 700-800 ml) of total water intake. So if you drink 2 litres of water each day, along with your normal diet, you typically replace the lost fluid. If you are bored of drinking plain old H20 try adding fruit or vegetables to your drink bottle. My favourite is cucumber water!

  1.      Rest days/deload weeks

How much should I be resting?

In order to maximise your performance it is imperative to have rest days, so this means complete REST to allow your body to recover.  In conjunction with rest days it is also important to have deload weeks, here at Revo PT we deload our classes every 8 weeks where the volume still remains high however the intensity is decreased. This not only allows the muscles to recover but also the nervous system. What happens in your body during recovery is vital for keeping yourself in the best possible health. If you want to make sure that your body is strong and you can perform at the highest level possible when you engage in physical activity, do what you can to facilitate recovery in your body.

When you are first starting out it is important that you give more body more rest as initially you will pull up quite sore due to DOMS (explained above). So perhaps starting off with 3 high intensity classes per week (and keep active during off days) and build from there. This is where you need to listen to your body and what is going to work best for you. If you are constantly sore then your body needs a rest day (or 2). Then you will find you come back fresh and ready to push yourself even harder! As your body adapts to high intensity loads you will be able to handle consecutive classes both physically and mentally.

Above all, listen to your body. When you feel good, go with it and when you need a rest, don’t feel bad for missing a day of training. You’ll come back stronger and get more out of your sessions if you find the right balance.

So train hard but do the right thing by your body by eating and hydrating regularly, consistent sleep patterns and minimal stress.

Long awaited Online Programming and Coaching now available

We are taking registrations of interest for our first initial intake for our online programming and coaching program.

This is a unique opportunity to work with our highly skilled and qualified coaches even if you don’t have the ability to head in to work with us here at the gym in South Melbourne.

This opportunity would be idea if you’re outside of Metropolitan Melbourne or if you’re someone who prefers training on your own rather than in a gym setting.

If you’re keen to be a part of our initial intake of only 10 individuals please get back to us immediately as this is an extremely limited first intake.

This limited intake will be able to take advantage of our unique Foundation membership 50% ongoing discount.

To take advantage of this foundation discount and lock in this ongoing rate head across to our online store via the links below and use the discount code: revoptonlinefoundationmember

Who will you be working with?

The coaches launching our online programming and coaching program are none other than Jaimie-Lee Brown and Nathan McCulloch.

Jaimie-Lee Brown: “Strength and happiness comes from finding balance.”

Before personal training, Jamie-Lee was a teacher for children with special needs.

While the classroom may seem worlds away from RevoPT, to Jamie-Lee they’re not so different.

In both roles, she helps people realise their best selves – something that takes patience, understanding, communication and trust.

She moved into training after using exercise as a personal stress-relief that offered mental and physical results. When people started asking her for advice, she knew she’d found a new career. With clients that range from their 20’s to their 70’s, Jamie-Lee doesn’t have a set training style. Her focus is on using your individual strengths and goals to create a tailored program that suits you.

You can read more about Jaimie Lee here: revo.pt/jaimieleebrown

Nathan McCulloch: “Change is the best thing you can do.”

Like most people who’ve completed the Overland Track, Nathan has a natural sense of adventure and it comes through in the way he trains.

He loves clients who don’t just enjoy a challenge, but provide them too.

Whether it’s requesting a new type of exercise or working around a physical limitation, Nathan believes that every session should be something you shape together. He’s flexible, relaxed and always open to new ways of working.

Nathan believes that change is the single best thing a person can do. It’s what saw him move from Tassie to Melbourne, complete a degree in Exercise and Sports Science, change his lifestyle and ultimately start a career in Personal Training.

You can read more about Jaimie Lee here: revo.pt/nathanmcculloch

Hear Jaimie and Nathan’s recent appearances on our podcast here:

  

 

 

 

Don’t forget that you can catch up with any of our post episodes of the podcast via:

The Apple Podcast App or

 

BASIC Membership Normally $30 Per Week

Our Foundation BASIC member special ONLY $15 per week ongoing. Offer ends April 30th 2017!

Our Basic coaching package is the ideal way to get started with your Coach

 

 

  • Customised goal setting
  • Daily custom programming
  • FitBot online account
  • Up to 7 emails weekly

Sign Up NOW here.

ADVANCED Normally $50 Per Week

Our Foundation ADVANCED member special ONLY $30 per week ongoing. Offer ends April 30th 2017!

Includes all of the services offered with our Basic Coaching Package PLUS:

  • 1 hour initial assessment
  • Regular phone contact
  • Regular email contact
  • Input from multiple coaches

Sign Up NOW here.

Take advantage of our Foundation member ongoing 50% off rate

To take advantage of this foundation discount and lock in this ongoing rate head across to our online store here via the links below and use the discount code: revoptonlinefoundationmember